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Running repairs: front shock absorber mounting

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Post by Phil Bradshaw » Club admin » Mon Feb 24, 2014 6:44 pm
Joined: Sun Sep 02, 2012 7:15 pm
Posts: 3825
Since the rather major B service last year there's not been much to do on the mechanical side but one of the front shock absorber lower mountings worked loose recently -

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Upper plate is different from the CF1/Facelift round type but the metric thread flat head studs eventually break off just the same -

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After grinding off the stud heads and punching out the remains of the studs it doesn't take long to tack weld a couple of bolts to the plate -

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Bolts used are 1/4-inch UNF x 1 inch long. (They're actually in straight although the angle of view makes them look misaligned.)

Sorted -

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Original M10 (17 mm AF head) centre nut retained to secure the saddle for the shock absorber eye bolt lower mounting.

As ever, even with the new bolts welded in straight everything bends a bit as the nyloc nuts are tightened.

No more rattly noises from the front suspension though. :)
  • What is real is not the external form but the idea, the essence of things. Constantin Brâncuși

'New' spare wheel carrier

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Post by Phil Bradshaw » Club admin » Fri Feb 28, 2014 4:48 pm
Joined: Sun Sep 02, 2012 7:15 pm
Posts: 3825
Later spare wheel carrier with 2 hook bolts (thanks to Derek thesingingposer) destined to replace very early carrier that sort of worked ok with a home brew hook bolt made out of M12 studding -

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After much descaling and de-rusting it took about a week of waiting for Fertan to work and 2 coats of Hammerite to cure before the 'new' carrier was ready to fit.

For a 195R14 tyre on a 5-stud wheel the two front supports 'X' dimension is 138 mm and the stop bolts positions are 3 and 5 -

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With the front supports and stop bolts sorted it's a 10 minute job to fit -

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Lots of grease on the hook bolts plus a 3/8-inch UNF lock nut on each -

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Fitting lock nuts avoids losing the hook bolts because they can unwind if left to their own devices.
Incidentally, for Facelift/CF2 models the original hook bolts had metric threads. They still work loose, or seize up if left dry of lubricant.

Just a new safety chain to find and fit at some point (one that came with the carrier rusted through almost); not needed when lock nuts fitted but makes removing/replacing the spare wheel that bit easier.
  • What is real is not the external form but the idea, the essence of things. Constantin Brâncuși

New alarm

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Post by Phil Bradshaw » Club admin » Sun Mar 30, 2014 10:38 am
Joined: Sun Sep 02, 2012 7:15 pm
Posts: 3825
The alarm system based on Pirana boxes finally died a death so it was time for a rethink because I've run out of spare units squirrelled away from when I fitted Pirana systems in the 1990s. Finding a replacement wasn't too hard though: things have moved on a lot and there's lots of units available with all mod cons for meeting Thatcham category 1 requirements.

The main difference I found is that the main box is tiny compared to Pirana boxes - basically a main processor and a few other components rather than old technology 8-pin chips, lots of them - and the amount of wiring is reduced by 'plug'n'play' add-ons that can be tucked away more easily in the somewhat limited space behind the CF dash.

The fun part was removing all the old system - yards of cable in two harnesses - and then figuring out where to put all the bits of the new system for minimum of cable extensions with each added joint being a potential failure point. Once that was done it took about an hour to install the whole system apart from toys like lock motors for the cab doors (for when the key barrels are frozen in winter!).

Tracker next on the list ...
  • What is real is not the external form but the idea, the essence of things. Constantin Brâncuși

Minor repairs

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Post by Phil Bradshaw » Club admin » Fri Jul 04, 2014 12:29 am
Joined: Sun Sep 02, 2012 7:15 pm
Posts: 3825
New rattle from the front suspension turned out to be the repaired right side shock absorber bottom mounting -

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Just needed the two small nuts tightened half a turn each.

Propellor shaft centre bearing well overdue replacement: it's been moaning for over 6 months and already has been off once for a dose of grease to keep it going. Finally got round to buying an Iveco Daily 40mm bore centre bearing but then, Sod's Law as ever, an original centre bearing came up at a reasonable price.

Propellor shaft comes off easy enough ... if the right size spanners are used.

Metric at the rear -

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And centre -

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Then to confuse things, Imperial at the front -

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Once the shaft is off the alignment of the three universal joint yokes should be noted before splitting the shaft -

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The two shafts pull apart at the sleeve joint behind the centre bearing -

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Gaiter over the sleeve joint is a push fit both ends.

Puller used instead of dragging out the press buried in the shed -

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Socket used as a protector to prevent damage to the sleeve joint splines.

Separator must bear on dust shield adjacent to the bearing inner race -

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Old, new GM replacement and Iveco Daily alternative -

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To fit the Iveco centre bearing the mounting bracket will need modifying to accommodate the wider spacing of the bearing mounting bolt holes and offset of bearing compared to the GM part.
The plan was to fit the bearing (assuming Iveco dust shields aren't hard to find), install the shaft and the original bracket separately then determine the optimum position to attach a piece of steel flat bar or angle to the bracket and drill bolt holes for the centre bearing.
Otherwise the bearing fits the shaft well and the assembled height of the bearing centre is the same as the original.

Fitting the GM bearing starts with the smaller dust shield, tapped in place with open side towards the rear using a piece of tube -

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Bearing is bumped on, again using a piece of tube, until it bottoms against the shoulder on the shaft -

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Followed by the larger dust shield -

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A spin of the bearing to check that nothing is catching then treat all three universal joints to a thumping to free off binding journals -

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With the flange supported, thump the yokes of the shaft and vice versa, similarly for the other two joints, until all journals move smoothly.
(Joints that remain lumpy after a thumping usually need replacing.)

All that's left before installing the shaft is to grease the universal joints (but stop pumping as soon as journal seals expand), smear the sliding joint splines with grease then reassemble exactly as it was with all jokes aligned before it came apart.

If the front flange is attached to the gearbox with one bolt and nut then the centre mounting can be fastened to the underbody crossmember after which all the front flange bolts can be fitted and tightened with less cussing.
Centre mounting bolts to the crossmember are easier to get at for tightening before fitting the rear flange.
To save on knuckles, at the front and rear flanges hold the nuts with an open end spanner then swing on a ring spanner on the bolt heads to tighten. On the front flange the nuts when tightened should be positioned for a flat to lock against the shallow rim on the gearbox flange.
  • What is real is not the external form but the idea, the essence of things. Constantin Brâncuși

Jump start solenoid

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Post by Phil Bradshaw » Club admin » Sat Jul 05, 2014 6:48 pm
Joined: Sun Sep 02, 2012 7:15 pm
Posts: 3825
A tweak to save having to drag out jump leads when I manage to flatten the starting battery in the winter.

The system employs a standard bulkhead mount 12V solenoid switch to connect both batteries together so that a discharged starting battery can receive a recharge from the leisure battery before attempting to start the engine, after which the leisure battery will boost the starting battery.

The original wiring -

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Apart from having no ancillaries wired to the leisure battery yet, this corresponds to -

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What I wanted to add is this -

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and then move the split charge relay wires to the solenoid terminals and earth because having them on the battery terminals is a pain -

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Switch supply fuse (10 Amp) used is B8 (centre row, bottom on 21-way fusebox) seeing as no headlamp wash/wipe is installed.
This is fed by the ignition circuit so that the solenoid can only be used when the ignition is switched on.
(Not recommended for CFs with contact breaker ignition because the coil can overheat if the points are closed and the ignition is left on for longer than a minute or two. Ignition supply isn't essential though; battery supply from fuse 1 or 2 (12-way fusebox) with a 10 Amp line fuse should be fine.)

Leaving the earth cables to last, the solenoid and split charge relay installed -

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Solenoid attached to inner sill using self tapping screws; star washers under screw heads to ensure a sound ground connection for the solenoid body and split charge relay earth.

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Panel switch used is a Hella 6ED 004 778-001 with an illuminated knob (red, orange or green) -

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This type of switch is rated at 8 Amp which is ample for nominal 4 Amp current draw of the solenoid.
Switch can be wired so that the knob glows dimly when off then bright when on, which is what I chose to do.
(Reversing the green wires on the switch disables the 'glow dimly' option.)

To accommodate using the leisure battery to boost the starting battery the two batteries had a new link cable (1-1) and earth cable (2-2) -

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(and, incidentally, the starter cable is new from the same 20 sq mm stock, to replace the original 16 sq mm cable.)

Works: from discharging the starting battery down to 11V across the terminals (starter running slowly), two minutes for a recharge (both batteries 12.3V) then start, with or without the solenoid switched on but the starter is more lively with the solenoid on.
(Solenoid switch warms up some when left on but didn't get too hot after about 10 minutes when testing it during installation.)

Only hiccup was the turn signal/hazard warning unit deciding to give up after the dash was back in place.
Turned out to be the unit playing up instead of 'omigod which wire have I disconnected?': water somehow has got into the unit.
Works fine now it's dried out so maybe I ought to do something about cab water leaks ... :oops:
  • What is real is not the external form but the idea, the essence of things. Constantin Brâncuși

Re: CF2 250P panel van.

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Post by VDUB384 » Club admin » Tue Jul 08, 2014 10:13 am
Joined: Wed Sep 12, 2012 9:01 am
Posts: 1400
That's a good idea having a access to jump starting at the Pull of a switch, I use a battery isolator on my camper to separate the two leisure batteries and I have a lead from the stater battery with a jump lead end which I attach to the isolated switch does the Sam job. Phil I don't think much of the smart com split charger your using mine failed on me .
Dave
Whilst good maintainece is the best prevention"If its not broken don't fix it."
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Re: CF2 250P panel van.

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Post by Phil Bradshaw » Club admin » Tue Jul 08, 2014 10:55 am
Joined: Sun Sep 02, 2012 7:15 pm
Posts: 3825
Smartcon voltage sensing split charging relay so far has worked fine, unlike another type that I tried.
  • What is real is not the external form but the idea, the essence of things. Constantin Brâncuși

Re: CF2 250P panel van.

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Post by VDUB384 » Club admin » Thu Jul 10, 2014 2:05 pm
Joined: Wed Sep 12, 2012 9:01 am
Posts: 1400
You can't beat a 35amp relay, my smartcom works now only on the fridge terminal .
Dave
Whilst good maintainece is the best prevention"If its not broken don't fix it."
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De-rusting ...

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Post by Phil Bradshaw » Club admin » Sat Sep 27, 2014 9:14 pm
Joined: Sun Sep 02, 2012 7:15 pm
Posts: 3825
Being various stages commencing at the start of the summer in changing the colour scheme from various stages between rust and white to all white in preparation for final painting in dove grey. Should have been done last year really, before surface rust turned into gaping holes, but a broken finger and damaged tendon during the summer put paid to that. :(

Back end before and after -

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Something like 6 weeks between the two with taking the doors off to bash the worst of the distortion and dings into shape, realign the hinges and fix the lock and latches so that they work properly.

Paint is Rustoleum lathered on as thick as possible, rust having been treated with Fertan to provide a stable base for the paint and old top coat ripped off wherever it was loose. Took a few weeks of experimenting on the offside rear quarter panel to determine the best approach; much sanding and skim filling over old lettering about 3 layers down ...

Side load door needed more serious attention -

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One the mend -

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One of the many trial fits during welding -

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So far so good -

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For the first time since I got the van the side load door actually fits the frame.

In the process the last of the rubbish CF2 plastic handles has been replaced with a Facelift cab door metal handle which needed extensions on the lock fork (steel tube pressed on) as well as a new LandRover lock barrel to match the cab doors -

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Bottom of the cab door on the passenger side has suffered from neglect too :oops: -

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Outer panel still sound so just the inner panel needed cutting out about 3 inches up from the uppermost crease and replacing with a new section made up from sheet -

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Still looks a mess on the outside -

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but that's next on the list along with the front edge of the step where it's parted from the rocker panel and also the rocker panel.
  • What is real is not the external form but the idea, the essence of things. Constantin Brâncuși

MoT test time again ...

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Post by Phil Bradshaw » Club admin » Thu May 07, 2015 7:40 pm
Joined: Sun Sep 02, 2012 7:15 pm
Posts: 3825
Time for the annual B service prior to the MoT test but unlike previous years when something needed a serious bit of mending if has been a case of nothing much to report because nearly everything is as it should be, at last.

So, apart oil and filter for the engine, all I had to buy was a tin of LM grease so I had enough to repack the front hub bearings with once they were cleaned out.

Rear brakes self adjusters had stopped working but only because the brakes needed de-dusting, duly done by washing down, and all the moving bits needed a fresh smear of water resistant grease, part of the B service anyway. In the process I had a peep under the brake cylinder dust boots -

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Pretty much as they were after the brake overhaul in 2012. Very pleasing. :)

Otherwise odds and bits like one of the number plate lamps needed the bulb spinning in its holder to make it work but nothing like brake pads and shoes needs renewing yet so all in all the cheapest B service the van has had since I acquired it in 2010.

Wheel the van in for its test some time in the next week or so, see what the tester says ...
  • What is real is not the external form but the idea, the essence of things. Constantin Brâncuși

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