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Ouch: collision damage.

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Post by Phil Bradshaw » Club admin » Mon Dec 23, 2013 11:22 am
Joined: Sun Sep 02, 2012 7:15 pm
Posts: 3825
What happens when someone in a Toyota Aygo wanders across a junction without looking.

Greasy wet road surface didn't help.

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I'm ok and driver and 3 kids in the Toyota just shaken up - ever so relieved about that. Toyota could be a write-off though - front wing, door, suspension, bonnet, front panel.

Got the front panel off to weigh up what's needed. About the only thing that I might be stuck for is an indicator lamp - rest is tin bashing, a lick of paint and maybe bring forward fitting new headlamps and supports if the Cibie headlamp support won't straighten out and adjusters click back together.

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Popped welds in the seam above the front panel lower mounting point will need re-welding but as it is it might make it a bit easier to pull the corner straight -

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I might have struck lucky with an indicator lamp: one on greedbay described as offside but picture is of a nearside one; we'll see when it turns up.

Meanwhile a few problems: lower mounting holes for the front panel about 8mm out sideways and outrigger twisted, bonnet fouling wing edge and passenger door not closing properly.

Home made body puller: 6ft anchor bar bashed into the ground 4 ft deep with a straining rope to prevent the bar from moving attached to the base of a handy fence post -

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Starting at the bottom, twisted outrigger section pulled straight with a bit of help with a big rubber mallet -

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Red lines indicate how much twist came out; straight stick of wood and a tape measure to make sure outrigger front matches offside.

After lots more pulling using every hole available (more time figuring out where to pull and in what order than actual pulling) -

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No tin bashing as such yet; wing needs to be pulled out at the top to open up the gap along the bonnet edge and it might be best to weld up the popped joins around the outrigger before going much further.

Door closes fine now though and front panel is back on temporarily to confirm bolt holes are where they should be.

Next day involved dodging showers ... but managed to do the welding around the outrigger, bash the wing into shape, skin some filler over the ripples that wouldn't flatten out without stretching the panel and throw some paint on for flatting off to disclose the imperfections -

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Also dealt with the surface rust around the edge of the wheel arch and a pre-existing dent at the front lower corner of the arch.

Front panel didn't take much to straighten around the headlamp support and panel edge -

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A good job that the panel doesn't show when the bumper and grille are on ... a case of as long as the headlamp sits right the rest doesn't really matter.

The bumper and brackets might take a while to sort out tidily because they took the brunt of the impact that did this to the Toyota (mashed the suspension too but it doesn't show in the photo) -

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Also shoved the van sideways about 2ft.

Bumper was a pain to get tolerably straight to get the van back on the road ASAP -

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How the corner sits now, a bit too far back but at least it's on -

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Gaffer tape isn't doing anything useful but it'll avoid anyone whingeing about sharp edges where the corner bumper is split.

Spare grille glued up where it was broken around the nearside headlamp aperture (how it came), finisher strip below grille sort of straight and Wipac headlamp plastic bowls installed -

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The Wipac bowls (with the backs cut off) are for new headlamps but they haven't arrived yet so the damaged Cibie lamp, support and adjusters got a seeing to, along with a spare (broken) indicator lamp that I'd forgotten about until it appeared when I was looking for something else -

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Took a whole 5g bottle of superglue and nearly half a pot of bicarb to fettle the Cibie stuff and the indicator lamp ... but they're on, sort of, and working.

Street legal now though and a ToDo list to work through to make it tidy -
  • Bumper really needs the welded brace at the end grinding off to ding out the buckle where the corner bumper fits over then a new brace welding in.

    Wing still not quite right - too tight on the grille edge and too high at the bonnet line - but it only needs a pull of 5mm or so and I can live with it like that for a while.

    Front panel needs a tweak too because the grille pulls in too tight at the bottom.

    Finisher strip needs a dolly making to fit inside the top edge where it's rolled over 180 degree to get the ripple out under the headlamp.

    Replace headlamps, hopefully before the damaged Cibie lamp falls out (the adjusters are on their last legs).

    Replace indicator lamp (only 2 studs in the lamp and b-all holding them in under the superglue + bicarb).
  • What is real is not the external form but the idea, the essence of things. Constantin Brâncuși

One step forwards, two back: screen leaks.

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Post by Phil Bradshaw » Club admin » Mon Dec 23, 2013 11:35 am
Joined: Sun Sep 02, 2012 7:15 pm
Posts: 3825
Emptied the back of the van for a clean start in fitting out the back a bit better and found that the bulkhead needed straightening. Everything in the back of the van must have slid forwards in the shunt: bottom of the bulkhead was one great big bulge.

So, out came the seats from the cab for some walloping room ... to find that the sound deadening matting was wet and the paint underneath was bubbled and soft as if attacked by paint stripper.

After some toil with wire brushes -

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Hmm. It's just the areas where the matting was wet that are affected. Makes me think that something in the matting that leaches out when it's wet isn't paint friendly because everywhere else is still sound.

There's no leaks to see after the downpour soon after I'd done scrubbing the floor so it looks like what's trodden in and gone through the holes in the original rubber mat may be what's made the matting wet. Crossed fingers anyway.

Had a think about what to do about the cab floor while bashing the bulkhead back into shape so that the uprights on the back are square with the floor -

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With only half the day left and rain preventing both cab doors from being open to get at the steps and door frames properly a de-rust and repaint of just the cab floor and seat bases to match got to be the choice (blodges are rain spots on the camera lens) -

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At least I can get the van usable in the morning now so that I can make it to the timber yard even though the seats will have to come out again to make everything else tidy round the bulkhead.

Oh bother: next morning I found that puddles had collected both sides overnight -

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Traced to the screen leaking again, probably from run-off from the roof, and water dripping through at the outer ends of the screen vents.

Tried a session with a rubber mallet bumping the screen seal to see whether it would pull down tighter but really it's something else for the ToDo list along with another re-paint of the floor when it's not so damp and dismal: too much dust caught in the paint and rain spatter from forgetting to close windows once the paint was on hasn't helped.

Meanwhile dodging more heavy showers made things a bit slow putting the cab back together minus floor coverings.

Very Big Grin

Re-discovered how well a SWB CF can perform when it's empty. Not done much for fuel consumption with the tendency to clog it on open roads (or for some loose bits falling off meanwhile, exhaust tailpipe for one) but the van won't stay empty for long so I might as well have some fun while I can. Lots of fun. :)
  • What is real is not the external form but the idea, the essence of things. Constantin Brâncuși

Fun with sheets of ply.

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Post by Phil Bradshaw » Club admin » Fri Dec 27, 2013 9:28 am
Joined: Sun Sep 02, 2012 7:15 pm
Posts: 3825
Made a start laying 10mm ply on the floor: done in 4 pieces to get the floor and a panel across the bulkhead out of 2 sheets of ply and an offcut -

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Centre and rear pieces are screwed down already, the centre pieces needing 10mm packing along the edges of the wheelhouses to keep things even. Front piece needs a flap cutting out for over the battery cover before it can be screwed down.

The fun bit was working with 8x4 sheets of ply outdoors in 40mph gusts of wind after the rain stopped. Ever so nice to have an even floor though - the steel floor ribs can be painful on the knees...

Front unit carcase

A couple more days of dodging downpours but the carcase for the front unit is done -

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Some bits look bowed but that's the camera: everything is straight and square.

From the side -

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Some pencil chewing & head scratching to be done yet: plan is to install drawers & shelves to fit what's going to live in this unit.

Front unit drawers, left side

More rain dodging {sigh} and a bit of back-tracking before everything dropped into place with the first 3 drawers -

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The top, middle & bottom drawers are all different in the the way that they fit the opening and order of assembly but now I've got a pattern hopefully the drawers for the right hand side won't take so much toil.

Main issue was in using deep section ball bearing runners -

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The runners are overkill in terms of weight capacity but I like a good margin for wear and tear.

They need a degree of precision in installing them though ... measure umpteen times before drilling for mounting screws.

Bits of 4mm steel rod keep the drawers shut for travelling and ride along the tops of the sides of a drawer when it's opened -

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More accuracy required in setting the rods in the sides of the opening so that the rods drop down of their own accord as the drawers close and then can be flipped up as the drawers are opened.

Jig made now for positioning the holes in the sides of the opening; jig also turned out just the thing for setting the bends in the rod.
  • What is real is not the external form but the idea, the essence of things. Constantin Brâncuși

Plan B

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Post by Phil Bradshaw » Club admin » Fri Dec 27, 2013 9:38 am
Joined: Sun Sep 02, 2012 7:15 pm
Posts: 3825
Started on the right hand drawers with the bottom one and was about to make a locking rod for it when it occurred to me that the locking rods will work just as well behind the drawer fronts and make things look a bit tidier.

So, scrap the existing 3 drawer fronts, move locking rods, modify the drawer sides to suit the rods then make new fronts and also a door for the centre cupboard -

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This is first fix, everything working (except the right hand drawer that now needs a different front). There's an amount of fettling to do to even out the gaps but I've run out of time with slave job shifts looming.

Well worth the extra day for a much tidier look though and a spin-off is that setting the lock rods before the drawer fronts are fitted is a lot easier than previously.

Centre cupboard door is held closed by magnetic catches, a bit of an experiment: if the door will stay shut when travelling then they can stay; otherwise I'll have to engineer a latch of some sort behind the finger hole.

Front unit drawers, right side

After shuffling through offcuts (euphemism for mistakes...) with being determined not to start cutting into a new sheet of ply the last of the drawers got done -

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Started the finishing by sizing the front of the middle, right drawer for a 2mm gap all round but then the belt sander upped and died; poor thing finally wore through its sole plate that then came adrift and wrapped itself around the drive roller (well, it's done a lot of miles of over some 12 years of use).

Even without the drawers finished I'm well pleased with achieving a flat front with minimal protrusions (the door hinges) -

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Wasn't so pleased about spending money on a new sander even though the one that fitted me the best for smaller work turned out to be the cheapest own brand from B&Q.

Left side unit, frame par done

The result of 2 days non-stop, of shaping ply to fit the side load door frame and body side while keeping the uprights parallel, square with the base and in line with the rear door frame edge -

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Base frame is tied to the body at the side load and rear door frames. Uprights eventually will be tied at the top to the cant rail and the front upright will have another tie about the level of the sash cramp holding things together to check alignments.

Left side unit, frame completed

More shaping of bits of ply to fit the curves on the van {sigh} and a re-think of how to tie in the top to the van body using the top shelf but once everything was screwed together it all went solid -

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Front edge of the rear upright has drifted out of true by about 2mm at the top but that's only because the top piece is still a bit tight on the back edge; it would have got done today but there was a dead Renault Master to go fix, hence the bit of 2x1 screwed down across the floor to keep toolboxes from sliding forwards (although I needn't have bothered - Renault had run out of diesel, is all, half hour job including travelling).

Once the frame is fettled and glued together (it's mostly dry jointed still) there's some drawers to make and fit and decisions to make about what else is going to live in this unit according to weight distribution once a 100Ah leisure battery is installed at floor level at the back. More head scratching...

Left side unit drawers

Another week of making and fitting drawers -

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It's not the making or even the first assembly into the unit that takes the time but making the fronts fit just so, involving much messing with alignments on the runners and locking bar positions so that all the drawers sit right when closed.

An example of dividers that are being knocked up in various arrangements -

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Dividers are just pinned in for now so that they can be changed as things find their way to where they're best kept according to how much they're used and then the dividers can be glued in. Hopefully this will be before the bare wood gets so grubby that it'll need lots of cleaning up before being painted (like the bottom drawer front salvaged from an earlier version).
  • What is real is not the external form but the idea, the essence of things. Constantin Brâncuși

Side pin wiper arms at last.

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Post by Phil Bradshaw » Club admin » Fri Dec 27, 2013 9:43 am
Joined: Sun Sep 02, 2012 7:15 pm
Posts: 3825
After nearly losing both wiper blades because the Araldite holding the plastic 7mm fittings on had gone soft the arms had a fresh Araldite fix using new fittings -

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Mentioned this to Skoota while giving him a hand with his Carlton (nice motor incidentally), to be presented with some side pin arms to play with.

Side pin arms had push-on spindle ends and the crank angle at the side pin end was more shallow than the CF arms but the length was right for converting the CF arms to side pin -

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First unhook the spring then drill out the rivet holding the arm together -

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Then open up the clinched over edges -

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After which the arm comes apart with a tug and a twist.

Transfer side pin bit to CF bit, replace rivet with M4 bolt and nut then clinch over to make the join tight.

Clamp side pin end in vice, bash to right shape then install -

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One happy bunny, much thanks to Skoota.

EDIT

After a trip out to Burnley in the rain even more pleased: side pin wipers a lot quieter and no judder as the screen dries out. Just need to remember to repaint them at some point...
  • What is real is not the external form but the idea, the essence of things. Constantin Brâncuși

Choke knob bulb, rear exhaust.

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Post by Phil Bradshaw » Club admin » Fri Dec 27, 2013 9:49 am
Joined: Sun Sep 02, 2012 7:15 pm
Posts: 3825
A 10 minute job that escalated: the choke knob warning lamp died so it got a new bulb -

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Simple huh? I wish...

In theory, once the rubber cover is peeled back and the lens is popped out the bulb should come out. However, it's in a recess with b-all room around the bulb to grip it and all that happened after sticking a piece of rubber tube to the bulb with a dab of superglue was that the top of the bulb came off.

Extricating the remains using dental picks took a while because I couldn't see properly inside the knob with it in the dash and the knob and inner cable weren't for budging out of the switch behind the dash cowl. Even with the cowl removed complete with cable detached from the carburettor I still couldn't figure out what was stopping the cable coming apart.

Bulb base came out though once I could see it properly and when reconnecting the cable to the carburettor the outer cable had 10mm ground off so that the inner cable poked through its screw nipple on the carburettor rather than barely being long enough for the screw to grip it - a little niggle that's wanted sorting since, um, about a year back but was thwarted because the clips at the knob end of the outer cable are a pig to release with the dash cowl in place.

At great expense

Exhaust fell to bits at the back, resulting in having to drive with windows shut and heater blower on all the time to prevent exhaust fume from getting into the cab while a new one turned up from Germany. Looks the part -

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but the old one was labelled 'Carlton estate' and would have fouled a floor brace if it hadn't been butchered.

New one also runs too close to the butchered floor brace -

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and the tailpipe stops a few inches short of clearing the rear bumper.

This misalignment probably is due to the front silencer outlet being cut down to fit the old rear section because the rear suspension strap sits too far back on the new resonator when the right way around to clear the lock seam along the box -

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One more item for the shopping list that never ends (well, it is a CF!): a sleeve to shove the rear section back to where it should be. Or a new front silencer if I can find one.
  • What is real is not the external form but the idea, the essence of things. Constantin Brâncuși

10,000 mile already: second MoT test.

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Post by Phil Bradshaw » Club admin » Fri Dec 27, 2013 9:58 am
Joined: Sun Sep 02, 2012 7:15 pm
Posts: 3825
After fixing the rear exhaust not much has fallen off since, apart from white paint apparently applied on top of polished original paint.

One thing that was a puzzle was the heater running cold during freezing weather along with the temperature gauge pointer barely moving from the cold end of the range. Fuel consumption wasn't too good either, down to about 16mpg from consistent 20mpg.

Thermostat checked out fine, starting to open at 88C and fully open by 100C.
Tried a new one in case the old one was getting tired: no change.
Then tried a 92C thermostat [QTH 118]. Result: heater, gauge and fuel consumption back to previous.

Likely the 88C thermostat will have to go back in once the weather is warmer but on the Opel engine it's just a hose clip to undo to get at it so that's not a problem.

Another niggle was the engine idle getting erratic, tracked down to the Air-Vac system vacuum motor diaphragm well split with added interest of broken link rod to the air flap.

Bit of 3mm welding wire made a new link rod and a Marigold glove cut up to fit worked as a diaphragm for a while and proved that fussy idle was just down to the air leak.

Really needs a replacement vacuum motor (later plastic body one that can be dismantled from the air intake) and I'm figuring on hoisting one off something like a Corsa. Meanwhile the system is working with Marigold glove diaphragm and if that splits the vacuum motor can be disconnected and vacuum tap plugged; not noticed any difference in engine performance ... yet.

Otherwise the van has been reliable so things are looking good for catching up on the ToDo list, already in progress with getting some paint on the woodwork in the back because it got mighty soggy over the winter and only now is dried out enough to work with.

MoT test time

A bit of a tinker the week before including engine oil and filter change because it was due.

Apart from service bits it needed one track rod end, a couple of bean can + exhaust glue patches on the silencer and the idle mixture turning down.

Result: pass, no advisories; CO 0.15% (3.50% max allowed*), HC 821ppm (1200ppm max allowed).

One happy bunny. :D

*GM specification; MoT test level is 4.5% max.
  • What is real is not the external form but the idea, the essence of things. Constantin Brâncuși

Water in the carburettor ... no more.

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Post by Phil Bradshaw » Club admin » Sat Dec 28, 2013 12:08 pm
Joined: Sun Sep 02, 2012 7:15 pm
Posts: 3825
(Originally posted as a separate topic: now in its place according to when it happened.)

I've been plagued by water getting into the carburettor along with fine silt blocking the accelerator pump jet screen even with a line filter installed that doesn't take long to disconnect and drain out or change when it's grubby -

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Several filters later and after pumping out the tank to dry a few months back and still having to clean water out of the carburettor float chamber near enough every week I decided on a different approach, initially considering either using Wynns Dry Fuel (£6.50 a go for about 3000 mile based on how much water is getting through) or installing a water trap with a screen.

What won was this -

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Overkill really and not that cheap with being CAV (32 quid including banjo unions, as it happens much the same as a new water trap to be sure of getting one with an intact screen and the seal not being rock hard with age) but it's one of the commonest fuel filters around and the equivalent Fram C1191PL element is only a couple of quid locally.

Only significant change was a new fuel pipe to the carburettor to achieve tidy hose runs -

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Needed a few other tweaks like moving the front lights earth out of the way but nothing too drastic so quite an easy install while the front panel was off (to deal with seized manifold bolts when changing the exhaust front pipe, another story entirely ...).

The only hassle is not being able to see what's in the glass bowl (heater box is in the way of squinting through the grille) but the drain tap is easy enough to get at.

So far there's not been a cough out of the engine for a few weeks now and when I had a peep in the float chamber there was no sign of any water or fine silt either: very pleasing.

The only unknown is whether the seals will tolerate petrol (the filter being meant for diesel applications) but I had a similar set-up on my last petrol CF350 in the 1990s and had no leaks between filter changes every year or so and can't think of any reason why things may have changed since then.

Fingers crossed. :D
Last edited by Phil Bradshaw on Sun Jan 12, 2014 3:58 pm, edited 3 times in total.
  • What is real is not the external form but the idea, the essence of things. Constantin Brâncuși

Re: CF2 250P panel van.

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Post by VDUB384 » Club admin » Sat Dec 28, 2013 6:34 pm
Joined: Wed Sep 12, 2012 9:01 am
Posts: 1400
Hi one of the best ways to solve water in the carb, it's just a pity you couldn't get one from a breakers yard it would have saved a good bit of money.
Dave
Whilst good maintainece is the best prevention"If its not broken don't fix it."
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Re: CF2 250P panel van.

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Post by Phil Bradshaw » Club admin » Mon Dec 30, 2013 11:44 am
Joined: Sun Sep 02, 2012 7:15 pm
Posts: 3825
VDUB384 wrote:... it's just a pity you couldn't get one from a breakers yard it would have saved a good bit of money.
It wasn't for lack of trying: around £20 for a used filter assembly or water separator without banjo unions and an amount of travelling to collect one. :(
  • What is real is not the external form but the idea, the essence of things. Constantin Brâncuși

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