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Re: CF2 250P panel van

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Post by VDUB384 » Club admin » Sat Dec 21, 2013 9:10 am
Joined: Wed Sep 12, 2012 9:01 am
Posts: 1400
Hi Phil, A trailer board is the best thing for testing it out, looks like you've been busy lol, how's my engine coming along?.
Dave.
Whilst good maintainece is the best prevention"If its not broken don't fix it."
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Re: CF2 250P panel van

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Post by Phil Bradshaw » Club admin » Sat Dec 21, 2013 2:28 pm
Joined: Sun Sep 02, 2012 7:15 pm
Posts: 3825
Trailer board that I've got works fine apart from the rear fog lamp: forgot to wire for that. :oops:

Engine is done apart from the sump: still not found the spare screws I've got to make up a full set so that the gasket sticks down properly.
  • What is real is not the external form but the idea, the essence of things. Constantin Brâncuși

Noisy tappets replaced.

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Post by Phil Bradshaw » Club admin » Sun Dec 22, 2013 8:01 pm
Joined: Sun Sep 02, 2012 7:15 pm
Posts: 3825
A bit of routine maintenance cropped up, i.e. engine oil and filter change, in part because it was due by mileage and in part because occasional clatter from the hydraulic tappets at higher engine speeds had gotten persistent.

Oil change uneventful in itself - a Mann W712 filter (equivalent to Fram PH966B) that came in the pile of bits in the back of the van when I got it, 5.5 litre of Delco 10/W40 oil and a new sump plug washer - but the clattering from the hydraulic tappets didn't quite go away and seemed to be on the way to being as bad as before by each mile.

The tappets weren't too clever when the head had to come off when the valve springs broke: a lot of pitting of the tappet bodies -

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That's not enough to make them clatter but since the head job I've acquired a few sets of tappets with a Manta engine that's destined to replace the original engine at some point so I dug out a set of likely contenders and took them apart.

The spring inside has to be compressed a little to make it easier to lever off the retainer. Once the retainer is off the plunger inside the tappet should come out fairly easily. Sod's Law that with being stored the plunger of each tappet was gummed in so it took much degreaser and a right angle probe in the oil drilling in the side of the plunger to twist and pull each one out -

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From left to right: tappet body; spring; plunger; seating; retainer.

Inside the plunger is a spring loaded ball valve -

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With the plunger open end upwards and filled with petrol to the level of the oil drilling there should be no leakage out of the bottom. First tappet to come apart passed this test so it was filled with oil then reassembled before taking apart another one because plungers and bodies are selectively matched so mustn't be swapped.

To refit the retainer the tappet has to be compressed again, this time so that the plunger will move at all against pressure built up in the assembly oil between the plunger and tappet body; seepage between the the two takes a while due to minimal clearance but eventually the seating shoulder does go flush with the top of the tappet and the retainer can be fitted.

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Out of 14 tappets 4 failed the petrol test and on close examination corroded and mis-shapen balls turned out to be the most likely cause. After a messy hour or so there were 8 shiny and working tappets lined up ready with 2 spare: very pleasing.

Replacement is easy because once a rocker arm is removed its tappet can be withdrawn and another one (liberally oiled) dropped in. Then the rocker arm is replaced and the adjuster nut tightened to just take out any clearance. Once all the tappets had been replaced adjustment was the same as before when renewing the valve springs, i.e. with the engine running including making an oily mess over the bulkhead with not bothering with a baffle plate over the timing chain. You'd think I would have made one by now...

With everything back together it only needed the engine cover to go back on before a test run to check things out but then a misfire kicked in. Mild panic before it dawned that there wasn't any accompanying clatter from any of the tappets and the cause was revealed soon enough by pulling plug leads off one by one to see which cylinder was affected (number 2) -

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Must have disturbed it without realising it and the end finally fell off inside the plug shroud; not given any trouble before now.

New plug leads to hand were for the slant engine, i.e. a bit too long for the Opel engine, so they needed some help to keep them away from the inside of the cab engine cover -

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And then a spin down the M60: no clatter now and the engine seems to pull better too.
  • What is real is not the external form but the idea, the essence of things. Constantin Brâncuși

Front panel and bumper.

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Post by Phil Bradshaw » Club admin » Sun Dec 22, 2013 8:09 pm
Joined: Sun Sep 02, 2012 7:15 pm
Posts: 3825
A fine morning seemed too good to a chance to miss for getting some painting done with having few days off from the slave job so the front end got taken apart, i.e. everything stripped from the front panel with a view to turning it back to black instead of white over-spray that has annoyed me since I got the van -

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The easy bit was removing loose stuff with a wire brush, a few dabs of Fertan rust treatment on the supports for the filler strip under the grille (thanks geebee - Fertan works a treat and cured in about 4 hours in direct sun), a good wash, dry off for a while then slobber some black paint on -

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One coat of pound shop gloss black, due a second thinned down flash coat once the first has had 24 hours to harden off. The radiator can wait until it gets a new core, when it should come back all black, and the inside of the panel can go all black next time it's removed.

The hard bit was dealing the front bumper, primarily to get at one of the welded support webs that had rusted away -

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First problem was detaching the plastic corners (each retained by M6 studs and well rusted nuts) so that the seized M8 bolts could be removed from the web support bracket -

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Fortunately after a bit of bashing and cussing the 3 studs unscrewed from the captive plates in both the corner pieces -

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after which a blowlamp could be used to cook the M8 bolts in the bumper supports to release them.

While the corner pieces were off the bracket on each that bolts to a brace attached to the front of the chassis outrigger also was removed for realigning by using a small nut splitter to deform the M8 nuts so that they would turn without snapping the captive bolts on the corner piece -

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The hardened flange nut (Astra exhaust manifold nut) used to hold the bracket while working on the second nut made a handy thread restorer.

Once the M8 nuts were off and the brackets reshaped the M6 studs lost their rusty nuts by simply splitting the nuts with a cold chisel; threads cleaned up and provided with new nuts, washers and lock washers -

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Gloss paint on the corners inherited with the van looked 'orrible -

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so it and the patches of white and blue paint underneath got scrubbed off using 120 grit aluminium oxide paper followed by lots of water with 180 grade wet and dry paper then nylon scourer to get somewhere close to original semi-matt finish -

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Then do the same with the other side ... that little lot took all day and still the bumper to do before anything can be bolted back on.

Front bumper support web mended, back primed in red oxide (actually red zinc phosphate) then well larded with gloss black after 24 hours for the red oxide to cure properly -

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(The apparent thin coat in 2 places is reflections.)

Some extra fillet welds have been added to the repair (original welds only at the ends on t'other side of the support web) -

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As soon as the black had tacked off enough to handle the bumper it got primer on the front (already prepared - much scrubbing and sanding before a dose of Fertan) -

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along with the finisher strip that goes beneath the radiator grille (left hanging on the washing line and I forgot to take a photo) and all the brackets had a coat after a bit of bending and bashing to get them the right shape and for good measure the bonnet release lever too -

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Something to do while paint dried: sort out the seized fixings on the front indicator lamps -

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Right side lamp was just a case of getting the flanged nuts off the studs (lots of wire brush and easing oil) then locking two M5 nuts on each stud so that they could be screwed back in to the lamp until they just bottom in the holes.

Left side lamp came off the van with half a support post missing, possibly because the stud has been screwed in too far. Thanks to raewaters' tip about bicarb and super glue it got rebuilt around the stud somewhat more quickly than using Araldite rapid -

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Lamps installed using a 1/4 inch drive handle: easier to use than a ratchet handle and also less chance of breaking the lamps ... the trick is to stop tightening as soon as the lamp support posts meet the metal of the wing -

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At some point the side repeaters either will be improved on or even deleted - wasn't an option on CF2 models as far as I can work out - because they don't match and the wiring is cr*p -

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Cibie headlump supports next -

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including cleaning up the adjuster screw threads (tool is a piece of brake tube with one end squashed in a vice) -

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Whether the Cibie supports will last long depends on the lamps passing the MoT test because the reflectors have started corroding around the side lamp holes and it's going to be easier and a lot cheaper to fit Wipac supports for sealed beam lamps than find some new Cibie lamps with the right fittings.

Headlamp reassembly: adjusters first -

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Then the headlamps -

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The plastic moulding slots into the headlamp tab then is turned 90 degrees.

Fitted to the van and working -

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Things started getting a bit messy from here because liberal quantities of warm WaxOyl were applied to all the bumper fittings prior to installation and afterwards.

Bumper front support brackets fitted: captive nuts click in to the slots in the brackets; left hand bracket has a notch to identify it from the right hand one -

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End support brackets loosely attached to bumper (right side; left side is mirror image) -

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Bumper installed and centralised with just the 4 Torx head screws fitted to hold it in place -

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Then the end bracket to front panel bolts (1) were fitted after which bolts (2) could be nipped up to just hold the bracket against the welded bumper support web then all the bolts tightened in the order (1), (2) -

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Stand back a bit to check that the bumper is on straight (amazingly it was - not very often that happens) then loosely fit the left hand inner wing bracket (bolt and stud 2, the stud in lieu of another M8 bolt because I'd run out of M8 bolts) then the plastic corner piece -

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Tightening order is M8 fasteners first then the M6 ones as numbered so that the corner piece can be pushed and pulled to align properly with the bumper and wing.

Step back again, to realise that the finisher strip that fits below the radiator grille should have been in place first. Um. A top coat of paint that got lathered on the inside of the strip earlier on wasn't quite cured but clouds were gathering so it went on regardless -

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Only one original plug for the plastic peg at the end of the finisher (found inside the wing when cleaning out accumulated crud) so a rubber grommet was used for the other side. Self tapping screws to the support brackets have plastic washers like the bumper Torx head bolts. Left side corner needed a tweak, followed by fitting the right side corner.

Front face of the finisher had a splash of coach enamel, not a grey that I had in mind but dark crimson. This is because when I dug out the red oxide primer I found 4 litre of Superfleet that I'd forgotten about that was mixed to match Tekaloid dark crimson 2 vans back (LDV as it happen).

No argument: give dark crimson a go, see whether I like it. Managed to get a coat on and tack dry before it started raining so the grille and number plate were thrown on to make the van usable -

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Hmm. Hard to tell whether I like the colour from just a thin strip.

Rain stopped play but a few days later the paint brush came out as the clouds cleared. Took the finisher strip off to flat it down for a second coat of colour, which went on well thinned down some, then decided to try the bumper the same colour instead of black -

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Took the best part of 5 hours, mostly dealing with patches of rust pitting that needed a thin skim of filler and lots of flatting down; removing the corner pieces and other bits to leave the bumper supported just by the end brackets was relatively effortless, in a way a reward for the time and effort in getting everything cleaned up and fitting nicely.

Considering that the paint is rather old and I had to lay it on as quickly as I could to avoid brush marks I'm quite pleased with the result: there are some brush marks where I kicked off a bit too slowly and there's a few rust pits and bumps that I'd missed but they should fill and flat out for the second coat.
  • What is real is not the external form but the idea, the essence of things. Constantin Brâncuși

MoT test time.

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Post by Phil Bradshaw » Club admin » Sun Dec 22, 2013 8:12 pm
Joined: Sun Sep 02, 2012 7:15 pm
Posts: 3825
A week or so before the MoT test some kind soul broke one of the mirror arms when the van was parked up. I could have fitted the original Vitaloni mirror but I thought that giving it a go with superglue and bicarb was worth a try -

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Interesting how the (new not so long ago) die-cast mirror arm is shedding paint and corroding quite rapidly; wondering now whether the zinc content is acting like a sacrificial anode because existing rust spots on the doors haven't got any worse since fitting the LandRover arms & heads...

Anyway, mirror arm still intact after a 200-odd mile round trip and good enough for MoT test. Whether the rest of the van is fit for MoT test remains to be seen.

Moment of truth - passed MoT test. Well bite me!

A few advisories: slight play in front wheel bearings and a track rod end (the one that hadn't been played with). As soon as the rain stops I can deal with those.

Emissions came out at 2.28% CO and 165 ppm HC.

Headlamps dip was biased for LHD: some silly sod had got the Cibie bias switch wrong way about; this is the position for LHD -

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Sorted.

Tester also commented that the tow ball obscures the rear number plate. It does if viewed at number plate level but that's how it came -

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Otherwise the number plate isn't obscured in terms of speed camera angle; I think that I'll worry about it if ever Plod moans about it. Can always take the tow ball off if need be.

Since replacing the hydraulic lifters (cam followers) the engine has been running so much better that I had a play with some numbers to see whether fuel consumption has actually changed much.

Using a rolling average basis (i.e. mpg over 100 mile or thereabouts) -

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Steady decline from best initial figures (after broken valve springs and other inherited bugs sorted over a period) bumped up a bit when the spark plugs were renewed but replacing the rattling lifters seems to have made a substantial difference.
  • What is real is not the external form but the idea, the essence of things. Constantin Brâncuși

Stitch in time: starter overhaul.

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Post by Phil Bradshaw » Club admin » Sun Dec 22, 2013 8:22 pm
Joined: Sun Sep 02, 2012 7:15 pm
Posts: 3825
The time came to deal with worn starter motor brushes and bearings before the starter motor gave up completely; brush set is Wood Auto SBR 585, bearings are Cargo 140500, a whole £5 -

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Bits supplied by Osborne's of Moss Lane, Royton, Oldham. 01706 847 581.

Starting with the earth brush -

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Old brush cut off leaving about 8mm of braid intact that was tinned; new brush braid splayed out by pushing a ball pen down the middle -

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New brush braid wrapped over tinned old braid, bound with a thin strand of copper wire (left) then soldered (right) -

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Field brushes replaced likewise; original insulation sleeve (blue) retained to slide over the new brush insulation -

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This is so that the solder connections can be insulated by the original sleeves because the new sleeves wouldn't pass over the solder joints -

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Drive end bearing was well worn -

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After driving out the worn bearing a new, pre-oiled bearing was pressed in using a bolt, nut and washers (3/8 inch bolt used) -

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Check fit of armature shaft in new bearing -

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Commutator end bush was left alone because there was no difference in fit of the armature shaft between old and new bushes -

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The apparent wear of the commutator end cover isn't anything to worry about: it's the face against which the armature brake ring bears on as the starter disengages -

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The brake ring must stay dry or it won't work; any lubricant used for the commutator end bearing must be sparingly applied.

The slot 'A' is where the peg 'A' of the yoke locates -

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Putting it all back together: armature thrust washer in place before locating armature assembly in drive end bracket -

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Then yoke located on drive end bracket -

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The fiddly bit: brush springs and brushes assembled into brush holder using rubber bands to hold things together -

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Then install brush holder after which the rubber bands can be snapped and removed -

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Commutator end cover installed -

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The through bolts are loosely fitted to locate the end cover while the brush holder securing screws are installed and tightened.

Drive end bracket then removed leaving the armature in place so that the pinion lever assembly can be installed -

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A To Do Later item: lever fork pegs are very work but it's a 40 mile round trip to Oldham for a new one. Fitting the lever the right way around will help though: it was t'other way about when it came out, hence the wear.

Refit the drive end bracket but before finally installing through bolts the insulation (sticky tape) was replaced by heat shrink tubing -

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Pinion lever pivot pin and circlip -

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Head of pivot pin fits in a recess on one side of the drive end bracket -

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Solenoid and return spring -

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installed -

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The solenoid needs to be pushed against return spring pressure then rotated to engage the tongue in the slot between the drive end bracket and yoke in order to insert the Torx head screws.

Field coils link lead secured to solenoid terminal -

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Commutator end support bracket -

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installed with washers each side of the bracket -

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The nuts are only finger tight to allow for adjustment of support bracket position when starter installed on engine.

A quick test of the starter using jump leads is a good idea before installing it on the engine. One thing to check is that the armature does slow down very quickly as soon as power is disconnected; this confirms that the brake at the commutator end is working.

Installation: I've found it best to get the commutator end support bracket position right before sorting out the wiring; after the two 17mm A/F head bolts (1) are tightened the bolt (2) can be nipped up after which the nuts (3) can be tightened -

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Bolt (2) has to be removed before the wiring can be sorted -

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The engine harness to the left is secured by a clip that goes under the head of the bolt (2).

Comparison of old brushes against a new one -

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Just a new pinion lever to fit once I get one after which the solenoid to yoke gap can be sealed with silicone RTV.
  • What is real is not the external form but the idea, the essence of things. Constantin Brâncuși

Re: CF2 250P panel van

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Post by Phil Bradshaw » Club admin » Sun Dec 22, 2013 8:25 pm
Joined: Sun Sep 02, 2012 7:15 pm
Posts: 3825
Had to bite the bullet and get a new fuel pump in the hope that it will cure the worsening oil leak, the spare used pump faring no better than the original one here dribbling oil from a vent hole -

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New pump got to be a Moprod one for the Opel Rekord, for under £10 rather than the silly money that CF ones go for.

It's the same type with identical plunger stroke with being for the cam in head engine but the inlet and outlet are in different positions -

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The outlet also is smaller diameter but that can be accommodated by warming up 6mm rubber hose in hot water so that it will stretch to fit the 8mm pipe to the carburettor.

This is why I went for a Moprod pump -

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The top can be rotated in relation to the bottom so that the outlet position falls right for clearing the alternator mounting.

This means tapping out the spare six holes but the screws are neither 4mm nor 11/32-inch, the only sizes of taps that I could lay my hands on without emptying the shed (and maybe not finding the right thread even then).

Bugrit: 11/32-inch UNF first taper tap used to start a thread for the screws to bite into then roll new threads into the alloy body using the screws.

Pump installed -

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I wasn't too bothered where the inlet landed, just the outlet because the pipe to the carburettor runs close to the alternator mounting and there's nowhere else for it to run really.

The Moprod pump doesn't have a screen filter like the CF pump so this installation also needs a line filter on the tank side of the pump, installed underneath the heater box -

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Terry clip works alright on its own but an O-ring stretched across the ends should makes sure that the filter stays put.

Using 6mm hose on the inlet side of the filter and 8mm on the outlet was determined by not enough 8mm hose to do both. Might make me think about which way round the filter goes when it's time to replace it...
  • What is real is not the external form but the idea, the essence of things. Constantin Brâncuși

Starter pinion lever replacement.

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Post by Phil Bradshaw » Club admin » Sun Dec 22, 2013 8:27 pm
Joined: Sun Sep 02, 2012 7:15 pm
Posts: 3825
Osborne's in Royton came up with a pinion lever (£4, Cargo part number 130844) -

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Solenoid is the first bit to withdraw after releasing the field coils link lead and removing the Torx head screws -

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The brush holder screws don't need to be disturbed because the only the drive end plate needs to come off to release the pinion lever.

Once the pivot pin is removed the through bolts also can be removed -

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Pinion lever drops out once the drive end bracket is withdrawn -

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Spring pin that retains the lever to the solenoid plunger can be driven out of the plunger stem by supporting the lever on a socket -

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When fitting the new lever the spring pin should be aligned centrally in the solenoid plunger stem -

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Reassembly: contact surfaces lubricated with LM grease then the lever assembly is placed in position -

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followed by the drive end plate that then can be secured by refitting the through bolts -

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Pivot pin installed -

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When installing the solenoid the lip that slots into the gap between the yoke and drive end plate needs coating with silicone RTV (Loctite 598 used) before rotating the solenoid to refit the Torx head screws -

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Gap can be completely sealed once the Torx head screws are tight -

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(There didn't seem to be much point in sealing the gap when the brushes were replaced because the starter was going to come apart again for the pinion lever.)

The clue to the reason for the wear of the pinion lever fork pads: marking on the lever -

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This marking and corresponding marking on the flange of the solenoid plunger confirms that the lever has been incorrectly installed at some time in the life of the starter -

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Starter operation sounds a lot cleaner now: healthy click as the solenoid operates and no rattles when the starter spins free.
  • What is real is not the external form but the idea, the essence of things. Constantin Brâncuși

More paint: side load door sill, rear corner.

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Post by Phil Bradshaw » Club admin » Mon Dec 23, 2013 11:03 am
Joined: Sun Sep 02, 2012 7:15 pm
Posts: 3825
With a few days before my next slave job shifts I decided to get some paint on the sill under the side load door before all the undercoat washed off and while I was at it also fettle the back bumpers.

Managed part of it, the sill and one back bumper -

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This was because I discovered tin worm in the sill closing panel while jet washing mud and crud from under the wheel arch. It got to be a quick cover-up though, to seal up the sill from spray, rather than end up with the van off the road for too long while making a piece and welding it in (and likely find more thin tin to replace...).

Before and after -

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Pieces of plastic chippy tray lid stuck in with filler after a dose of Fertan on the rust (a while waiting for the Fertan to do its stuff) then a couple of layers of paint lathered on. Liberal amount of Waxoyl inside the sill before replacing the plastic plugs then more over the paint. At least it will knock out easily enough when the time comes to make a proper job of it.

Rear lower corner wasn't too bad but the bumper brackets were somewhat twisted and rusty; took as long to clean up and mend the brackets as it did to prepare the corner and get 2 coats of paint on it (about 4 hours between coats)-

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More Waxoyl, inside the rear lower corner and over everything that the bumper covers.

And then the bumper: layers of paint scrubbed off using 120 grade aluminium oxide, smoothed off using 240 wet&dry then finished with 0 grade steel wool; seemed to take forever.

Distortion due to the exhaust tailpipe being aimed into the bumper in the past life of the van wasn't too hard to straighten out using a hot air gun but the reflector wasn't for being mended so had to go back in pretty much as it came out -

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Doesn't look much different from the back -

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but the bumper fits a bit better along the side now -

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and now it'll unbolt without any problems when the rear valance gets done (one of the original Torx head bolt snapped in the side bracket, hence the hexagon head bolt nearest the number plate).
  • What is real is not the external form but the idea, the essence of things. Constantin Brâncuși

Window regulator.

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Post by Phil Bradshaw » Club admin » Mon Dec 23, 2013 11:16 am
Joined: Sun Sep 02, 2012 7:15 pm
Posts: 3825
Time for the driver's door window regulator to be replaced came when the handle carried on turning when the window was shut. Shouldn't take long I thought; the job time is only 0.8 hour...

Getting the regulator out isn't too hard, starting with the door trim.

Lock release plastic escutcheon removed by levering along a longer edge where the clips are (in this case also avoiding adding to an existing break probably caused by levering at a shorter edge) -

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Pull handle simply unscrews; screw heads are No 3 size -

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Regulator handle also unscrews after the plastic filler is removed -

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If the clip 1 is pushed out with a finger from the back of the handle then a thin screwdriver blade can be inserted between the filler and handle to release clip 2 after which the peg 3 should pop out easily (if it's not already been broken by previous incorrect removal/replacement).

Door trim panel then can be removed. A small paint scraper with a 6mm slot ground in the edge inserted under the flange of each plastic retainer will prevent the retainers from pulling out of their slots in the panel -

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With no damp check film behind the trim panel to remove (as ever...) the drop glass bottom stop next can be unscrewed -

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Life can easier when putting things back together if the lower guide channel on the lock side of the door comes out but this isn't essential; screws are on the door lock edge -

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Channel should then slide off from the glazing rubber, shown here outside the door inner panel for clarity although the channel can only be removed through the larger aperture after it's clear of the glazing rubber -

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The glass should come out without removing the door top edge seals but the inner seal is best removed to avoid damage if the roller guide on the bottom of the glass catches on it. Easy enough: prise up one of the ends then gently peel the seal from the door edge -

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Regulator adjuster channel nuts can be removed and the channel withdrawn by sliding it from the roller on the end of the regulator balance arm -

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The glass needs to be about half way down to disengage the remaining 2 rollers so it needs supporting at the top edge to prevent it from tipping and jamming when winding it down.

Once the glass is about half way down it can be tipped, lock side upwards, and disengaged from the rollers after which the glass can be turned some more, to about 90 degree from horizontal, then withdrawn upwards through the slot in the door.

Regulator then can be unbolted from the door inner panel. Once the regulator is detached from the panel the arms need to be held parallel so that the regulator can be rotated inside the door before it can be withdrawn lengthways through the larger aperture.

The problem -

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Losing teeth at the top of the glass travel could have been due to slop in the drive spindle but another problem existed: part of the top glazing rubber had folded inwards and prevented the glass from fully closing without a fight. After failing to persuade the rubber to behave because it was so hard that it started disintegrating the answer was to find one in better condition -

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(Add 1 hour to job time: spare rubber hiding in a black bag in box of wiper bits, not door bits; note to self - tidy up spares collection...)

The glazing side rubber on the lock side needs to be fully upwards in its channel for the top rubber to butt against it. The side rubber wouldn't budge though so it had to be removed first by pulling it downwards out of its channel then refitted using water and some liquid soap and pushing it up the channel until it butted against the top.

Water and liquid soap also are needed to press the top rubber into the channel groove lips in the top of the door using a tool about 8mm wide -

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Once the rubber is secure in the channel the outer lips can be located on the edges of the inner and outer door panels -

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Glazing rubber on the hinge side checked as well: no problems found this time - sometimes they're twisted and prevent the glass from moving smoothly.

Spare regulator wasn't hard to find; difficulty was choosing the best of two in not very good condition, both having some spindle wear and neither spindle drive friction washers doing much to prevent a glass dropping on its own.

First peen the spindle to reduce the slop in the drive; a screw in the drive is needed to support the spindle rather than damage the die-cast part -

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Then compress the spindle body until the friction washers can be felt to work when the regulator arm is moved -

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(Another half an hour or so gone - vice in shed, shed full of stuff with nowhere else to live at present ... some scrap batteries unearthed to add to the weigh-in pile for next week though so not so bad.)

The glass that came out had lots of scratches on it where it looks like over-spray from a paint job has been removed using sandpaper. Another rummage to find a better glass then remove similar over-spray but using a thin scraper with the edge stropped on leather to remove all burrs, and lots of water -

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A rust stain, probably due to drips from the gutter edge finisher on the van that the glass came from, took a lot of vinegar and polishing to make any impression on it. (Another half hour or so...).

Installation starts with the regulator that bolts in easily enough; needs to be wound to about half-way before installing the glass.

Glass goes hinge side first through the slot in the door after which it's a fiddle to engage the regulator arm rollers in the channel in the glass then engage the glass in the side glazing rubbers, hinge side first then the lock side once the hinge side is properly located.

Adjuster channel next, same way around as it came off but nuts left loose -

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Glass needs to be supported with its top edge roughly horizontal so that the adjuster channel studs can be manoeuvred through the door panel holes.

Once the glass is raised and supported with its top edge parallel with the door top edge the adjuster channel position can be adjusted to suit and the nuts tightened -

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Glass lower stop next, rubber pad uppermost -

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Much of the original felt pad on the door outer skin side has disappeared; maybe best left like that because it can hold water.

Lock side lower channel can be slipped onto the glazing rubber using water and liquid soap; once it's installed the screws can be tightened with the glass fully down against its lower stop -

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Now an important bit: check that the glass moves freely throughout its travel and especially when it engages the top glazing channel. The glass should be engaged in the top channel by about 1 inch, confirmed using a strip of Scotch tape and a ball pen -

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Damp check film reinstated using polythene bag and peelable vinyl tape: roughly cut to size using the door card as a template -

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Loosely stuck on, door release and regulator spindle holes cut -

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Taped all round then trimmed where anything shows when door card fitted -

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6mm thick white foam pad around regulator spindle is closed cell type, i.e. won't soak up water.

Once the door card is installed the pull handle, lock release escutcheon and regulator handle are the last bits to go on. Regulator handle position should be vertically downwards when the glass is fully raised.

Only a little job, but it ended up taking best part of 4 hours. Oh the joys of looking after a 25-year-old CF2. :)
Last edited by Phil Bradshaw on Sat Dec 19, 2015 4:59 pm, edited 1 time in total.
  • What is real is not the external form but the idea, the essence of things. Constantin Brâncuși

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