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CF2 250P panel van.

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Post by Phil Bradshaw » Club admin » Wed Dec 18, 2013 9:24 am
Joined: Sun Sep 02, 2012 7:15 pm
Posts: 3818
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CF250P panel van with side load door, white, 84420 miles, first registered in Luton August 1986.
Apparently not been on the road since 1995 and kept garaged meanwhile.
Acquired with MoT certificate expiring May 2011 & running on 2 cylinders.

Transported to the wilds of East Lancashire by BSC Recovery, to lose the driver's door handle before the van rolled off the truck. Not their fault though - handle already broken and had been bodged on.

Day 1. Security, a strong smell of damp and a poorly engine.

Although the driver's door handle is broken it's pushed back on for now to cover the lock release inside; the van is parked driver's side tight against the fence to stop the door from being opened.

Meanwhile, although the rear lock works neither the passenger door nor the side load door could be locked from outside. Both handles are bust where the clip that holds the lock barrel and lever should fit and between them and the driver's door there's only the one lever (fork thing in photo) and no clips -

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For now the passenger door has the least broken handle bodged using an internal circlip in a groove melted into the plastic with lots of glue on top; with the side load door locked from inside I can at least keep the local urchins out of the van when I'm not looking.

The rear floor is sheeted with chipboard but that's bone dry so the cab got stripped first -

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There's some welding to do: driver's seat base front left floor mounting -

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The weld remnants next to the crack was where the broken seat base had been tacked to the floor.

Left rear floor mounting for the seat base -

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Driver's door step -

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That's it in the cab: despite the foreboding as rotting floor matting came out, rust elsewhere is only skin deep and the cab floor just needs cleaning and repainting. Driver's seat squab (knackered) and seat base probably will take longer to sort out than the cab floor.

Engine misfire was tracked down to cylinders 1 & 2: Air-Vac vacuum pipe connectors had perished and split -

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Fix -

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One fitted at servo non-return valve -

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and the other to the vacuum motor on the air filter (to the left of the black case) -

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and check the air filter element same time: seems to be nearly new.

Checked the ignition system anyway and also did a compression test while the spark plugs were out: 150 to 165 psi.

Seller of the van said that the crankshaft front oil seal needs replacing and there is a drip that looks ominous -

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but with a bowl underneath the drips turned out to be oily water -

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More water pump leak than crankshaft front seal methinks.
  • What is real is not the external form but the idea, the essence of things. Constantin Brâncuși

Day 2: cab floor repairs

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Post by Phil Bradshaw » Club admin » Wed Dec 18, 2013 9:27 am
Joined: Sun Sep 02, 2012 7:15 pm
Posts: 3818
Driver's seat base floor mounting points welded; front -

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Cracks stitched up then finished flush using a 4" disc flap wheel before welding a repair washer on top. Remains of seat base to floor weld 'repair' ground off as well.

Rear mounting point done likewise, floor cleaned with soap and water then all bare metal given a coat of Kurust -

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Once Kurust had gone off, floor cleaned again and, once dry, Granville over-paintable PU caulk was run into seams that grinned too wide for paint to seal -

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then a coat of primer once the caulk had cured (2 hours) -

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International solvent-base metal primer used: what I had lying about that I've found works well with Tekaloid (also lying about, Traffic White) rather than a particular choice.
  • What is real is not the external form but the idea, the essence of things. Constantin Brâncuși

Days 3 to 5: paint cab floor; driver's seat repair

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Post by Phil Bradshaw » Club admin » Wed Dec 18, 2013 9:30 am
Joined: Sun Sep 02, 2012 7:15 pm
Posts: 3818
The rest of the floor also scrubbed up, Kurust treated and primed -

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Meanwhile the driver's seat had a dose of looking at; how it came -

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Patch-up started with the squab cushion -

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New basecloth spray glued on -

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Chipped foam layered up using spray glue -

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Chipped foam taken well proud of required contour then given a haircut to smooth out the line to match the other side of the cushion.

Squab cover sewn up along the piping seam and a new backcloth added before stuffing the cushion in with a layer of Dacron over the chip foam and rebuilding the seat. Not a particularly good job because the vinyl of the cover has gone hard with age so couldn't be pulled too hard while securing the backcloth but it'll do for a while.

Driver's seat base well shot -

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but Scoobydoo let me have the one she took out of her van when she fitted different seats so that had a lick of bashing & some paint before fitting it.

Result so far: all but the driver's step fettled and undercoated, driver's seat base bolted down onto a bed of PU sealer and seat plonked in position -

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In the process some loose wires got tidied up: a piece of speaker cable stuffed into the +12V terminal of the heater switch but not going anywhere else -

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Radio wiring and left side courtesy lamp switch cable (purple+white) -

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Radio and clock wiring tidied up with a 3A line fuse on the supply (purple); red+white is from the dash illumination circuit.

Whether I'll fit a radio and clock depends on finding an original CF2 mounting panel.

A new bulb in the courtesy lamp, both door switches working -

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Waiting for primer to dry before the passenger seat base can be glossed ready to fit and still the crack in the driver's step to repair...
  • What is real is not the external form but the idea, the essence of things. Constantin Brâncuși

Day 6: side load door realign; passenger seat base.

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Post by Phil Bradshaw » Club admin » Wed Dec 18, 2013 9:32 am
Joined: Sun Sep 02, 2012 7:15 pm
Posts: 3818
The van came with the side load door bottom hinge looking like it had had a wallop (along with the sill below the door, well buckled) -

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I was going to leave realigning the door as part of the rolling restoration the van will be getting once I can use it. However, I'm going to fit a bulkhead behind the seats first and while I was sizing things up a problem arose: the bulkhead side support obscures access through the apertures in the B post -

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On top of this, once the plastic trim was scraped from the bottom of the B post I discovered a very good reason to remove all the CF2 stick-on trim -

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The B post otherwise is sound as is everything it's attached to it at the bottom so it withstood the bending and bashing to straighten the hinge mounting point (door removed with hinges); door had similar treatment and both have been roughly finished until I can move the van away from the house and open the door fully to do a better job of it -

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The remains of the trim adhesive is proving to be a pain to remove...

Door fit now, weather seal actually meeting the top of the door frame as it should -

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Much work to do on the door yet: apart from creases in the outer skin, the latch edge looks it has had a crowbar in it and the edge looks like it has been bashed back down with hammer and chisel. Net result is that I can't adjust the lock striker properly because the outer edge of the door fouls the body -

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The door shuts ok though so that'll do for now.

Meanwhile, with the passenger seat base bashed back into more or less the right shape, de-rusted, primed and undercoated off the van, cab floor, seat bases and passenger step have had a coat of gloss -

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  • What is real is not the external form but the idea, the essence of things. Constantin Brâncuși

Day 7: gear lever, handbrake lever.

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Post by Phil Bradshaw » Club admin » Wed Dec 18, 2013 9:34 am
Joined: Sun Sep 02, 2012 7:15 pm
Posts: 3818
The reason for gear selection being somewhat vague -

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The gear lever turret is ok though -

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The pivot pins are hardened and although they were loose once they were removed and cleaned up good old Loctite (Bearing Fit) came to the rescue prior to refitting the gear lever.

Gear lever repair -

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Much hand filing of the ball profile where it sits in the turret and the 2 slots until one of the pivot pins from the turret fitted, most of it using a small flat file: a bit slow.

A wipe of CV joint grease on the plastic bearings in the turret socket and under the retainer cap before refitting -

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followed by the dust boot -

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Can find all the gears first time now.

Splits in the top of the gear lever boot wouldn't glue together very well so some rubber tap washers were fitted using cyanocryolate adhesive, one at a time so that each could be clamped in place using a bolt, nut and washers while the adhesive cured -

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Handbrake lever needed a good clean before lubricating the ratchet and pawl and fitting a temporary grip layered up using textured heat shrink sleeving -

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Refitting -

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First, cable for the switch needs to be passed through the hole in the handbrake lever floor plate -

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Correct operation of the switch by the right hand edge of the lever is achieved by positioning the switch bracket appropriately as the bolt through the lever is tightened -

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Earth cable eyelet is trapped between clean faces of the switch bracket & lever.

With a bulb in the warning lamp (it was missing...) -

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Left, handbrake on; right, handbrake off. This lamp also is for the brake pressure differential warning (PDW) switch on the brake master cylinder that kicks in if either of the hydraulic circuits springs a leak. The handbrake lever switch in fact is the test switch for the PDW system so it's never a good idea to remove the bulb when the handbrake switch needs adjusting...

Finishing off: gear lever and handbrake lever boots, floor bungs and gear lever knob -

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The gear lever knob needed a 3/8" UNF nut underneath it before the knob could be tightened and stay tight; some trial and error getting the position right before securing the nut with a dab of Loctite threadlocker.

Engine cover aperture seal had peeled off intact (2 pieces, one over the top edge, the other around the floor edge) so it was refitted using spray glue. Cover itself isn't so easy to fit yet but it will be easier when the passenger seat is fitted once it's had some mending (sitting on the base isn't too comfortable); the engine cover needs some bending too so that the front 2 floor pegs align with the cover holes without too much cussing and kicking.

A little annoyance sorted as last job before packing up for the day: the side load door lock was fouling the latch -

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Take 1 rubber mallet ... to smack the latch to bend the frame about 2mm towards the rear of the van. Sorted. :)

Midnight oil - lighting stalk switch

What the van came with -

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The lighting switch is CF2; both stalk switches work electrically but the indicator self cancel only worked on one side and the switches swivelled as a lump on the steering column tube; a matching set would be so much better too.

Out of spare stalk switches to hand the best match was an earlier lighting switch to go with the existing wipers switch but it had a broken eyelet terminal on the dip beam cable (blue+red).

The broken pieces from original (1, 2) & spare (3) switches -

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The broken lug is what should engage in a slot in the steering column tube to prevent the switches from turning on the tube.

Finished item -

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Socket terminals locking tabs need to be poked inwards in order to remove terminals from the harness moulding; afterwards the tabs need to be prised out as in the inset photo in order to lock the terminal back in the moulding.

Switch body pivot pin needs to be drilled and tapped out to take a set screw, in this case a pan head 5.32" UNF screw pinched from a Delco distributor (vacuum unit securing screw). The pivot length to the shoulder under the ground off end must not be reduced past removal of remnants of the smaller diameter ground off end or the indicator switch part won't move.

The 5/32" screw used isn't round in section but has a triangular form that allows a thread rolling action as the screw meets the end of the cut thread in the switch body pivot pin; this has effect of locking the screw in the pivot pin. (A normal round section screw will require threadlocker adhesive.)

A star washer between the eyelet terminal on the green+brown cable and washer beneath prevents movement of the eyelet terminal that could loosen the grip of the screw.

The smaller pivot pin in the stalk itself can be re-used after lightly counter-sinking the holes in the switch body and drilling the ground off end of the pin 1mm diameter about 1.5mm deep for staking with a centre punch whilst supporting the other end of the pin on a flat-end punch gripped in a vice.

An alternative is to replace the original pin with a 1/8" Sellock roll spring pin (file or drill out plastic to suit, tight fit in the switch body, slack fit in the stalk end) provided the Sellock pin does not protrude sufficiently to short against terminals close to both ends.
  • What is real is not the external form but the idea, the essence of things. Constantin Brâncuși

Day 8: wipers, cab step repair

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Post by Phil Bradshaw » Club admin » Wed Dec 18, 2013 9:38 am
Joined: Sun Sep 02, 2012 7:15 pm
Posts: 3818
Came to move the van so that the crack in the front of the driver's step could be repaired, to find the left side mirror head on the floor -

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the driver's door handle missing -

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and a puddle in the driver's foot well -

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Mirror was loose anyway so probably only needed a nudge to fall off and just the one puddle after the thunderstorm a few days back ain't so bad. Can't fathom why anyone would bother to rip off the door handle though: with the van tight against the fence the door would open about 2 inches max.

So that's a pair of LDV/LandRover mirror arms and heads to buy, reseal wiper spindle housings and hope the screen isn't the culprit and go for earlier chromed alloy handles (plastic handles are the pits in my view - one smack and they're off).

Lighting stalk switch installed -

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but the horn didn't work; turned out to be a bad earth at the horn.

Screenwash and wipers had a looking at while I was tinkering at the front. Left side washer jet had to have the ball popped out of the plastic body before the crud inside could be blown out - one to do after soaking the jet in hot water to make the plastic pliable - and the reason for the wipers barely touching the screen was superfluous pins -

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The arms have 7mm straight ends and the fittings are right for them and the rivet in each blade; the pins are for side pin arms and fitting them as in the top photo just jammed the blades rigid on the arms so that just the lower edge wiped the screen. Now got a clean screen, on the outside anyway.

Driver's step repaired and finished as far as undercoat -

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Heater cover panel found in the junk pile in the back of the van when it was delivered -

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Passenger side floor mat has had something leak or spill on it that has softened the rubber -

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Might need a bit of thinking about before final fit.
  • What is real is not the external form but the idea, the essence of things. Constantin Brâncuși

Day 9: passenger seat, headlining.

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Post by Phil Bradshaw » Club admin » Wed Dec 18, 2013 9:40 am
Joined: Sun Sep 02, 2012 7:15 pm
Posts: 3818
Passenger seat refitted after much sewing of split squab seam closest to the door -

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Like the driver's seat, the squab cushion isn't too clever but only because something has been spilled on the seat that melts PU foam. Driver's seat squab is sagging already: can't pull the cover tight enough to make it any better with or without any more padding for fear of the cover tearing though. At least the squab doesn't bottom on the frame like it did before the seat was patched up.

Tears in headlining patched, biggest one about 4 inch long -

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Sod's Law that what looked fine with the headlining hanging down loose pulled cock-eyed once the headlining was back in place. Oh well. Doesn't shout as much as not doing anything about the tears before fitting the bulkhead behind the seats: bulkhead top panel fits just in front of where the wiring for the courtesy lamp hangs down.
  • What is real is not the external form but the idea, the essence of things. Constantin Brâncuși

Day 10: Rear floor & internal bulkhead.

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Post by Phil Bradshaw » Club admin » Wed Dec 18, 2013 9:41 am
Joined: Sun Sep 02, 2012 7:15 pm
Posts: 3818
Got round to lifting the chipboard from the rear floor and removing a bucketful of sand and dust in the process.

Left side, forwards of the wheel house -

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Left side rear corner -

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Detail of closing panel above rear lower corner -

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Not as much to do as I expected and right side looks to be clean enough to seal up as it is -

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One oddity: the fuel tank vent hose looks like it's been eaten -

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First fit of the bulkhead behind the seats -

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Side supports are riveted to the B posts: 3/16" diameter steel pop rivets, 26 off, is heavy going with arthritic thumbs...

Bulkhead is a bit knocked about and needs some bashing yet to fit nicely before removing the seats to get at the bottom edge where it's screwed directly to the floor -

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The floor mounting for the passenger seat belts is the hard part when it comes to final fit of the bulkhead because the lap belt and inertia belt stalk buckles won't pass through the aperture in the middle of the seat: seat has to be in place before the belt mounting can be bolted to the floor.
  • What is real is not the external form but the idea, the essence of things. Constantin Brâncuși

Day 11: locks, cab door handles.

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Post by Phil Bradshaw » Club admin » Wed Dec 18, 2013 9:43 am
Joined: Sun Sep 02, 2012 7:15 pm
Posts: 3818
A set of 4 LandRover same key lock barrels turned up today so the cab doors got earlier metal handles to replace the plastic ones.

Once a handle is in pieces the lock barrel can be removed by pressing in the small spring-loaded brass locking pin and levering the barrel from the press button shell -

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Only 1 of 5 wards still intact in this barrel; any old key fits...

The LandRover barrels had thinner escutcheon flange ends where the key enters and need a packing to prevent the barrel from moving out too much when the key is withdrawn. A 13mm diameter internal circlip is just the thing -

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Push button assembly -

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Handle assembly -

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Stud at button end had come out with the seized-on nut; Loctite threadlocker used to retain stud once nut removed. 10-12mm protrusion limit is for the fork to clear when it turns with the key.

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The really fiddly bit: fitting the butt end circlip -

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Second handle was more of a fight due to corrosion but in the end I won and now there's key access both sides of the cab -

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Repaired plastic handle that came off the passenger door now is on the side load door using Araldite Rapid to provide something to retain the circlip; repair isn't likely to last for very long -

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but meanwhile it'll save having to move the van to get in through the back doors in order to unlock the side load door now the bulkhead prevents access from the cab.
Last edited by Phil Bradshaw on Sun Dec 27, 2015 1:38 am, edited 1 time in total.
  • What is real is not the external form but the idea, the essence of things. Constantin Brâncuși

Day 12: rear door handle, rear lamp wiring issues.

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Post by Phil Bradshaw » Club admin » Wed Dec 18, 2013 12:30 pm
Joined: Sun Sep 02, 2012 7:15 pm
Posts: 3818
The 7-ward lock barrel in the CF2 rear handle can't be replaced by a 5-ward LandRover barrel.

Fortunately most of what was wrong with the handle was loose securing screws - 2 socket cap screws which to my surprise turned out to be 5/32" UNF when I had to find a spare nut - and caked gunge in the barrel sleeve holding most of the wards in the unlock position.

Rear door handle removed and dismantled, parts cleaned and ready for reassembly -

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The key has to stay in the lock barrel all the while it's not in the handle: the wards in the metal barrel in the rear handle can fly out when not being watched and it takes a while to find the tiny springs...

Drive eccentric clicks onto the end of the barrel (spring loaded brass pin like cab lock barrels); square section locking piece is fitted so that the peg on the eccentric engages in the cut out -

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then the solid dowel is tapped in to engage in the groove in the drive eccentric -

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Handle assembly -

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Once the handle was back together I realised that there should be a stop pin in the hole in the handle base that is screwed to the door to prevent the handle from being turned backwards -

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Take the handle apart again...
3/16" diameter Sellock roll spring pin is a good fit in the hole; 1" pins that I have are too long & the pin had to have about 1/4" ground off after it was fitted.

Drive square fitted -

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The end of the square in the handle is shaped to accommodate built in misalignment of handle with the latch release square.

Extra bits: stiffener bars made up to prevent the door outer skin flexing around the handle -

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Final fit -

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Stiffener bars fixed to door inner skin using M5 bolts; bolts hidden by door card.

From the outside -

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The lock to make use of the hasp and staple that the van came with is a Chinese one (£2.50 from the local cheap shop) but it wouldn't fit until I'd removed the hasp and staple to replace large head roofing bolts with high tensile ones with heads that the hasp would clear & then adjust the door latches so that the doors met flush in the middle.

Had a look at why the left side reverse lamp didn't work before packing up for the day, to lose first the sidelight then the indicator lamp before I'd finished -

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Everything now working but one to look at again: playing with wiring in poor light isn't much fun.
  • What is real is not the external form but the idea, the essence of things. Constantin Brâncuși

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