Re: A cooked engine

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Post by Phil Bradshaw » Club admin » Wed Dec 11, 2013 4:08 pm
Joined: Sun Sep 02, 2012 7:15 pm
Posts: 3825
Cylinder head assembly

Gaskets -

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Surplus gaskets from the Gaskets-direct set -

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These are for FD/FE Victor, Ventora & HC Firenza, Magnum engines (single & twin carburettors).

Valve springs, caps, collets -

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Rotator caps are for the exhaust valves. Inlet valves have plain caps.

Out of 2 sets of valve springs the one from Skoota's engine came out ok for free length -

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The springs from the cooked engine were well under.

First thing to do was fit the inlet valve stem seals -

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Valve stem & face were lubricated, valve, springs & cap fitted in the head & then a valve spring compressor was used to insert the collets -

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Inlet valve of number 4 cylinder was the first to be fitted.

I tend to use a compressor designed for deep skirt cylinder heads because it centres more easily than a conventional fork end compressor.

A dab of grease helps stick the collets in place, taper downwards. Fumble fingers me needed tweezers & just-so adjustment of the compressor to get the collets in right; not something that bothered me in my younger days...

Anyroadup, once the compressor was released & the collets looked to be seated right a few dings with a hammer on the top of the valve stem made sure, valve & spring covered with a cloth first in case a loose collet flew off to ricochet anywhere.

Inlet valve done, then exhaust valve -

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Then the same again for the valves for cylinders 2, 3 & 4 -

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  • What is real is not the external form but the idea, the essence of things. Constantin Brâncuși

Re: A cooked engine

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Post by Phil Bradshaw » Club admin » Wed Dec 11, 2013 4:13 pm
Joined: Sun Sep 02, 2012 7:15 pm
Posts: 3825
Fit camshaft in housing.

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Camshaft assembly starts with fitting the camshaft into the housing from the front; I found this easiest by clamping the housing front uppermost in a woodworking vice & easing the camshaft in with the bearing journals lubricated with fresh oil.

End cover aligned to fit studs & thrust plate engaged with cover peg so that the plate can be correctly positioned in the cam housing. Using a dab of grease in the housing prevents the plate from falling out -

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Thrust plate can be re-aligned once the centre bolt & large washer are fitted - Loctite 243 threadlocker, camshaft wedged with a piece of wood at a cam lobe - and the grease should keep it in position while fitting the cover. Centre bolt is 3/8" UNF, 5/8" long, 9/16" AF head; tightening torque is 34 lbft (46Nm).

Cover is first fitted without its gasket and using 3 plain nuts (5/16" UNF) in order to tighten the cover evenly to trap the thrust washer against the cam housing. This is for checking camshaft end float -

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0.16mm is at the top end of 0.03 to 0.18mm (0.001 to 0.007in) but it's enough leeway to not have to worry; camshaft thrust washer wear usually isn't a problem area & most times what end float exists is what the engine left the factory with.

EDIT. Checking camshaft end float this way accommodates any slight distortion of the end cover that checking between the thrust washer and camshaft with feeler gauges won't reveal. When the end cover is distorted enough to require re-shaping the feeler gauge method can be used.

A spray of glue both sides of the gasket (hung on a wire hook for spraying second side) -

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Wait 10 minutes or so ... then realise the shed was too cold for the glue to work. Duh. So go find something else to do for an hour or three while everything including the cam housing warmed up indoors & over-spray was nicely sticky, then re-coat to be sure.

Anyway, gasket faces cleaned & gasket stuck into end cover, then cover fitted using new 5/16" UNF nyloc nuts -

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The cover only needs to be tightened to trap the thrust plate; any more distorts the cover. (New nuts aren't always necessary but I've got plenty.)

The gasket from the Gaskets-direct head set seemed a bit thin compared to GM ones but was compressed all round by the cover enough to seal. We'll see how long this gasket lasts; hopefully the glue will prevent it from squeezing out & thinning in the process, something that even thicker GM ones will do in time.

If a gasket won't compress all round then the cover will be bent around the stud holes & needs re-shaping to be sure that the gasket won't leak.

Camshaft front oil seal, lip greased, was easy to bump in evenly & flush with the front of the housing using a soft face hammer -

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Seal is identical to the auxiliary shaft seal: steel shell single spring-loaded plain taper lip type, 2.504" diameter & 0.375" thick; shaft diameter (for lip working diameter) is 1.75".

Last thing to do before fitting the tappets & setting up valve clearances is fit the front bolt & thick washer with enough extra washers to make up about the same thickness again as the original washer -

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This is to prevent the bolt from bottoming in the camshaft threads when used to turn the camshaft once it's assembled to the cylinder head. Bolt is 3/8" UNF, 7/8" long, 9/16" AF head. Leaving the thick washer as found is best (usually they're bent); straightening it out can crack it & it could split in two when used again.
  • What is real is not the external form but the idea, the essence of things. Constantin Brâncuși

Re: A cooked engine

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Post by Phil Bradshaw » Club admin » Wed Dec 11, 2013 4:17 pm
Joined: Sun Sep 02, 2012 7:15 pm
Posts: 3825
Tappets; bench valve adjustment.

Before the tappets could be refitted the stem protrusion H of each valve was checked -

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Cylinder 1
Exhaust - 1.068"
Inlet - 1.099"
Cylinder 2
Exhaust - 1.072"
Inlet - 1.10"
Cylinder 3
Exhaust - 1.074"
Inlet - 1.095"
Cylinder 4
Exhaust - 1.072"
Inlet - 1.10"

I think that J&E have done well to keep the exhaust valve stem protrusions close to spec. of 1.07". This figure was arrived at by assuming that maximum valve protrusion allowed of 1.13" went with -0.06" 2nd under-size adjuster screws. It does, but only when the adjuster screw is only a few clicks away from the limit of its travel as I found out when the exhaust valve tappets were fitted with their original standard size screws & the camshaft was assembled to the head.

The screws landing about mid-way across their tappets is a lot more comfortable because this gives about 0.018" of adjustment each way, so bedding in wear can be accommodated (clearances open up) as well as valve/seat wear (clearances close up). However, then came a problem: I couldn't find the 1st & 2nd under-size tappet adjuster screws that I'm sure I've got somewhere, like 2 & 3 here -

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I was stumped for simply fitting under-size screws all round then. The solution was to grind ~0.03-0.04" from the inlet valve tappet adjuster screws as well as ~0.01" from the exhaust valve tappet adjuster screws (about what they need to remove wear recesses anyway). In the process, rather than take the inlet valve tappet adjuster screws straight down to an under-size (-0.03" or -0.06") I ground just enough off each screw so that when the valve clearance was adjusted the screw landed mid-way across its tappet.

This meant assembling & re-assembling the camshaft to the head a number of times, each time cleaning everything spotless to avoid grit getting in. All this was done without a gasket; minimum thickness to allow for compressed gasket is 0.003".

Several hours later, the last screw was finished with about 0.04" ground off -

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The slight increase in taper angle compared with the standard screw is deliberate: taper should be 35degree for 1st under-size, 42degree for 2nd under-size. Grinding off the flat end (ID for standard adjuster) makes it a lot easier to get somewhere close so that each click as the adjuster is turned gets about 0.003-0.004" of adjustment.

Final bench assembly with everything cleaned one last time & freshly oiled -

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Last valve clearance check for now, 0.007" max. (0.003"+0.004" blades) for inlet, 0.015" max. for exhaust (to allow for ~0.003" gasket thickness).

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And where the adjuster screws landed -

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So, head & camshaft are ready to fit to the engine but maybe a re-think is needed on what to specify for valve stem protrusion when having seats fitted. Time to decide on a re-think is final valve clearance adjustment once the engine is running & has thoroughly warmed up; clearances have a habit of opening up once a rebuilt engine is running.
  • What is real is not the external form but the idea, the essence of things. Constantin Brâncuși

Re: A cooked engine

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Post by Phil Bradshaw » Club admin » Wed Dec 11, 2013 4:21 pm
Joined: Sun Sep 02, 2012 7:15 pm
Posts: 3825
Refit - short motor

Lump ready to go in, with engine mountings bolted on and the water pump fitted (something to grab hold of during the install) -

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Bolts are 5/16" UNC, 5/8" long; heads for right hand side are 1/2" AF, 7/16" AF left hand side with being close to the mounting itself.

Water pump gasket needed working on: it didn't fit neatly around the circular boss of the body -

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Fixed by pressing the gasket in place using the mounting bolts as guide pins and trimming off the excess -

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EDIT. This may have been the pump body casting rather than the gasket: no problems since fitting other water pumps.

With the front of the van wrapped over with a folded up dust sheet strapped on tight & a bit of assistance the lump was lifted to sit the middle flat part of the sump on the wrapped-over front (sump skids off too easily without the wrapping).

With 2 up front & 1 in the cab the second lift was in & down to engage the mounting studs in their slots -

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With a wobble fore & aft of the engine the dowels clicked in & the mountings could be secured (same fastening both sides) -

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If a nyloc nut doesn't bite on the stud when fitted then the nylon insert can be squished a bit more to work again by peening the top of the nut. Not recommended for rotating parts though - new nuts best then.
Last edited by Phil Bradshaw on Wed Dec 11, 2013 5:20 pm, edited 1 time in total.
  • What is real is not the external form but the idea, the essence of things. Constantin Brâncuși

Re: A cooked engine

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Post by Phil Bradshaw » Club admin » Wed Dec 11, 2013 4:33 pm
Joined: Sun Sep 02, 2012 7:15 pm
Posts: 3825
Transmission refit

First thing that was fitted was the clutch spigot bearing, removed & cleaned before building the short motor then packed with grease but left out until now so that it stayed clean.

Removal requires a slide hammer puller with a collet that fits through the bearing & expands to grip the bearing shell: Sykes-Pickavant one -

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Bearing is rarely a tight fit & can be refitted using a tube or socket; bearing is fitted rounded end first and an extra blob of grease once it's fitted doesn't go amiss.

Flywheel fits one way round only on the crankshaft dowels, when all the bolts will fit -

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Bolts are 3/8" UNF high tensile precision type, 7/8" long with 11/16" AF heads. Threadlocker (Loctite 243) should be used on the threads; tightening torque is 48 lbft (66 Nm).

Clutch housing locating dowels go in; leaving them out until now allows any crud that has got in the cylinder block threads to be cleaned out before fitting the gearbox. Dowels are steel, 0.595" outside diameter, 0.665" long, 0.065" wall thickness. 15mm copper plumbing tube can make a good substitute for missing dowels; these dowels must be fitted in order to obtain correct alignment of the gearbox with the engine when it's being fitted, or the gearbox front bearing can be worn out well before its time.

Clutch is best fitted using an aligning tool; this one is a metric type but just happened to fit nicely -

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Clutch plate needs holding in position while the cover is positioned on the flywheel dowels & it's a bit of a fiddle due to the weight of the pressure plate & angle of the engine. A way to overcome this is to loosely fit the bolts then align the clutch plate before gradually tightening the bolts to pull the pressure plate onto the flywheel dowels.

Once the centre plate is gripped by the pressure plate bolt tightening should be even across the pressure plate to avoid cracking the diaphragm spring as it pulls flat. Clutch bolts are 5/16" UNC, 3/4" long with 1/2" AF heads. Washers are rectangular section spring lock type. Tightening torque is 15 lbft (20 Nm).

While this was going on the gearbox had a clean. Paint brush cleaner used to good effect; it washes off with water with some washing up liquid in it. Gear lever fitted to prevent anything getting inside; it's held in with a sprung bayonet cap.

Clutch release bearing was smooth and tight so it had just a wipe to clean it. With grease inside the sleeve filling the groove within the bearing it slides onto the gearbox sleeve & the clutch fork is inserted into its aperture in the clutch housing -

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Then the clutch fork is pushed far enough through the aperture so that it can be engaged in the bearing slot and pushed onto the ball pin while ensuring that both sides of the spring clip engage underneath the head of the ball pin -

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Ball pin & clutch fork pegs that engage in the bearing should be greased before assembly. Provided the spring clip isn't damaged the fork usually clicks in place.

The square end of the gearbox input shaft is unusual; normally the end is chamfered to make entry into the spigot bearing a bit easier. Hmm. I didn't like the idea of trying to align this gearbox while supporting it from underneath so it got slung from an engine support beam minus the end fittings with its screw poked through the gear lever aperture in the cab floor; wooden blocks against the seat bases kept the beam from sliding backwards.

With the gearbox lifted & suspended so, top gear engaged to be able to rotate the clutch shaft using the rear drive flange, it went in without a fight once it engaged in the clutch. A longer clutch housing bolt was loosely fitted in one of the upper holes to align the clutch housing with the cylinder block dowels. Once the clutch housing met the dowels it meant that the gearbox spigot was well in its bearing & all the bolts could be fitted & tightened.

A tip here if the clutch isn't aligned just right: once the 2 longer bolts can be fitted in upper clutch housing holes (without their washers if need be) and are just nipped up keeping an even gap between the clutch housing & cylinder block faces the clutch fork can be levered backwards to release the clutch plate, when the gearbox should then go in up to the cylinder block dowels & all the bolts can be fitted where they should be & tightened.

Gearbox in place with rear mounting & cross member fitted (mounting loosely at this stage) -

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The 2 longer bolts fit in the lower clutch housing holes with dowels in (applies to all slant engines regardless of gearbox type).

Bolts are 7/16" UNF with 5/8" AF heads. 2 longer bolts are 1.71" long; 3 shorter bolts are 1.2" long. Tightening torque is 30 lb ft (40 Nm).

Rear mounting & cross member fixings -

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Where they go -

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With the cross member hanging from the rear mounting (ZF 5-speed fitment as in the photo) it's usually obvious which of the holes in the chassis where the cross member bolts should go in ... unless the left hand side engine mounting is shot. For chassis brackets with 7 holes it's the 3rd & 5th holes from the front; on this CF250 the cross member was one hole too far back before the engine came out & the rear mounting 3/8" stud was in the wrong hole...

Thin fibre washers for the cross member bolts are to keep bolts, bushes & washers in place on the cross member while fitting it; the washers should grip the bolt threads enough to do this but if they're tired or missing then a Royal Mail rubber band across each pair of bolts will do. If any of the large steel washers are missing then they must be replaced; B&Q repair washers for 10mm bolts will do. Bolts must be tightened until the sleeves are trapped between top & bottom washers and no more - the bushes will be sufficiently compressed - after which the lock tabs can be turned up against the flats of the bolts. 3/8" bolts & nut are 9/16" AF; 5/16" nuts are 1/2" AF.

Clutch relay lever, exploded view -

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Early pattern castle nut & split pin holding the relay lever on the bracket pin was replaced by a nyloc nut about 1978. Thackeray washer is to prevent the push rod from twisting during clutch operation. Adjuster ball nut is 13/16" AF; locknut is 1/2" AF; pushrod thread is 5/16" UNF.

Clutch housing front splash plate needs fitting loosely before fitting the relay lever bracket -

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Plate can be held in place by the 3 shorter bolts while relay lever bracket is fitted.
Bolts are 3/8" UNC with 9/16" heads.

Clutch relay lever & bracket fitted -

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Gearbox oil level needs checking when the van is level; seeing as it's parked on a slope this will have to wait until the engine is running.

Clutch adjustment: 0.1" (2.5mm) clearance between ball nut and clutch fork. Best to set adjustment coarsely then dance on the clutch pedal to settle the cable outer ferrule in the relay lever bracket, then adjust properly. The original clutch fork spring was a bit tired & loose so the front bracket was fitted twisted 90 degree to exert some pull on the fork to prevent it from rattling.

Last transmission bits, speedometer drive cable & propellor shaft -

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Unlike Vauxhall gearboxes the speedo drive seal is tight within the drive housing so can't be lost. Speedo cable run should have no kinks or sharp bends in it. The reverse light switch wasn't connected but if it works then it won't take much to wire in reverse lamps; there might be wiring in the harness already with a bit of luck.

Once the front flange is loosely held on the gearbox with 1 or 2 bolts the centre bearing can be bolted to the chassis bracket (1/2" UNF bolts, 1" long with flat washers & nyloc nuts, nuts & bolt heads 3/4" AF) -

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When the front section is on tight the rear section can be fitted so that the front yoke is in line with the front section front yoke as far as the splines allow.

Rear section fitted -

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Like the front section, bolt heads face the front of the van (they work loose less often this way around) & new nyloc nuts have been fitted.

Propellor shaft flange bolts are 3/8" UNF, 1.2" long; nuts are P-type (precision) nyloc; nuts & bolt heads are 9/16" AF. Bolts are best tightened diametrically & final tightening by turning the bolt with a ring spanner while holding the nut still gets things tighter without damaging the nut through spanner slip.

A slobber of grease on the cleaned-up sleeve to deter corrosion & a grease gun on the sliding sleeve nipple finishes off: from dry the sleeve needs to be filled until grease issues from the small hole in the cap facing the universal joint. Thereafter a few pumps every time the universal joints are lubricated usually is enough

Exhaust is the last thing to fit from underneath for the refit but that can't be done until the cylinder head is fitted.
  • What is real is not the external form but the idea, the essence of things. Constantin Brâncuși

Re: A cooked engine

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Post by Phil Bradshaw » Club admin » Wed Dec 11, 2013 4:45 pm
Joined: Sun Sep 02, 2012 7:15 pm
Posts: 3825
Fitting cylinder head

Bottom end with all ancillaries installed and all bare metal surfaces well oiled to deter corrosion but now with the distributor fitted any old how -

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This is to prime the oil pump, by winding the auxiliary shaft round until oil comes out of the camshaft oil feed. Whether a standard filter (Fram PH966B) or high capacity one (Fram PH977A) is fitted, filling the filter with oil before spinning it on will save a lot of turning of the auxiliary shaft.

Incidentally, when I started using high-capacity filters on slant engines I discovered on my own CF350 that the oil ran cooler as well as stayed cleaner for longer. I think this is because the filter sits smack bang in the middle of the air stream through the ventilation slot below the bumper, an unintended consequence that turned out good for me because my 350s worked hard for their keep.

With excess oil mopped out and the top face of the cylinder block cleaned off & dry the locating dowels and camshaft oil feed restrictor (clean!) can be fitted -

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Next, the cylinder head gasket and restrictor O-ring seal -

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The Gaskets Direct approach of using sealer around the gasket is interesting; GM & Payen gaskets rely on the gasket material itself sealing to the cylinder head & I've had no experience of problems with either so this looks like belt and braces & could deter leakage when the O-ring seal dies a death eventually.

With all pistons still about half way down their bores & pistons 1 & 4 on the up-stroke, plonk the cylinder head back on, fit all 10 bolts -

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then tighten evenly, from centre outwards.

Inlet manifold studs are different lengths: longest goes at the front, then the next longest, then the rest all the same length. Earlier engines have another stud right at the back, the same length as the other 2 to the rear, instead of the bolt.

Manifolds fitted along with the fuel pump -

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The fuel pump can be primed before fitting it by connecting the inlet to the tank pipe & working the pump lever; with a length of hose on the outlet the first spill of petrol with any crap that it flushes out can be caught in a container then discarded.

Next, the water pump by-pass pipe to the rear of the inlet manifold (fit both unions loosely before tightening either), camshaft and timing belt -

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All 10 camshaft housing bolts need to be tightened evenly from the centre outwards and in stages so that the housing pulls down evenly.

On this engine I've chosen to use the paper gasket with Loctite 5922 rosin-based glue because I've discovered that it works rather well; if it fails then plan B is to delete the gasket & use Loctite black RTV silicone instead. Difference of about 0.003 inch valve clearance adjustment without the gasket has to be allowed for though.

The pulleys for the camshaft & auxiliary shaft may have 2 timing marks on each, a round mark & a vee mark on opposite sides. The auxiliary shaft pulley is fitted with the vee mark facing outwards & the camshaft pulley is fitted with the round mark facing outwards.

Turning the camshaft first to align the 2 pulley marks with a straight edge (or length of string pulled tight - works for me) before rotating the crankshaft to align the crankshaft belt pulley key with the TDC (top dead centre) mark on the face of the cylinder block will avoid valve contact with pistons provided the crankshaft hasn't been rotated from pistons 1 & 2 rising before fitting the cylinder head.

The elbow connected to the water pump outlet should have gone on before the timing belt though. Oh what a silly sod! However, with the tensioner slackened off it can be eased in once the crankshaft is rotated backwards enough to slacken the belt that side.

The external TORX head tensioner adjuster bolt is worth keeping: the bolt is tougher than an ordinary 5/16" UNC hexagon head bolt & can be wound up tighter for it.

First check/adjustment of valve clearances is done now, after which camshaft cover can be fitted, then the distributor with the crankshaft at 9 degree before TDC (timing mark on cam belt cover) and the auxiliary shaft & camshaft pulley marks re-aligned -

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Distributor rotor position faces the camshaft when everything is aligned right & the corresponding terminal on the cap is for No 1 cylinder (front), then 3-4-2 anti-clockwise. Pretty much everything else (carburettor etc.) was fitted before the cam belt cover.

Before fitting the cam belt cover it's important to make sure that the 3 washers (1, 2 ,3 above) on the studs for the cover are BIG ones to prevent the plastic of the cover from distorting too much around the studs when the nuts are fitted & tightened. The cover then will be easier to remove & refit later.

Cam belt cover fitted -

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View from the back -

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Red stuff on the cam cover gasket was Loctite spray adhesive to stick the gasket to the cover but the temperature was way too cold for it (& my fingers!) to work & the gasket fell off when the cover was removed for final valve clearances adjustment. Carpet glue did the trick in the end once the gasket & cover had a clean.

The engine fired up & ran at this stage so the ignition timing got done while things were easy to see with the radiator out of the way.

That's it for the cylinder head apart from final adjustments once the cooling system is re-instated.
  • What is real is not the external form but the idea, the essence of things. Constantin Brâncuși

Re: A cooked engine

User avatar
Post by Phil Bradshaw » Club admin » Wed Dec 11, 2013 4:46 pm
Joined: Sun Sep 02, 2012 7:15 pm
Posts: 3825
LPGA (Autogas) reinstatement

There was some trial & error to find the best places to fit everything but I won in the end by removing the lot then making it all fit in with the evaporator under the heater box. Originally it was wedged between the radiator and oil filter so tight that it made me wonder how the oil filter ever got changed.

Anyway, the end result -

Evaporator under the heater box, new vapour hose with stainless steel braid sheathing -

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This made the heater hose runs a lot easier with the evaporator having to be teed-in in parallel with the heater.

Gas solenoid valve ended up a bit higher than it was originally, with the petrol solenoid valve moved so that hose runs could have plenty of flex in them -

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This needed a new gas pipe, 6mm copper with insulating sleeving, and a couple of barrel olives; the pipe runs under the bonnet back edge to the wing then down beside the heater box, clipped using rubber hose insulators.

The blue cable for the evaporator solenoid valve following the gas pipe is 'thin-wall' having the same conductor cross-sectional area as the original cable that was too short to reach.

The supply originally was from coil terminal 15 and as such wasn't fused so a mini blade type line fuse was spliced into the ignition supply (white cable) at the bulkhead connector -

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Fuse is 5A.

Before the front grille was fitted the cooling system has a pressure test -

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and when everything was tight (a couple of hose clips needed renewing) both the heater and evaporator were vented while pressure was maintained in the system.

The cable dangling across the front of the radiator got removed too; it was speaker cable wired between the headlamps dip beams so the fuse for the nearside dip had its end caps cleaned to fix the fault.

Daftest part was moving the mixer from where it had been stuffed in the air intake hose just behind the air filter. It should sit on top of the carburettor but it was missing its 3 securing screws and the seal inside. Some 5mm bolts cut down to size and 1 O-ring later it fitted and sealed.

All the LPGA system needs now is a bit of paper to say that it conforms with ECE regulations...
  • What is real is not the external form but the idea, the essence of things. Constantin Brâncuși

Re: A cooked engine

User avatar
Post by Phil Bradshaw » Club admin » Wed Dec 11, 2013 5:05 pm
Joined: Sun Sep 02, 2012 7:15 pm
Posts: 3825
And finally...

First trip out around the block (before the LPGA was working) the engine pulled well but backfired a couple of times and then wouldn't idle without winding the mixture screw right in. Odd. It was late though & I was more than ready to be home and in the shower so I didn't tinker with anything then and left it for when the LPGA was to be sorted out.

When I returned the van had some fresh petrol in because the gauge was reading low ... and the engine ran sweet once it warmed up again. Then the penny dropped: the van had been standing long enough for what was in the tank to go off. No mending needed then & once the LPGA system was working the engine ran fine on that too.

Valve clearances opened up once the engine was thoroughly warmed up and overall, first adjustment + final adjustment, I had to wind in all the adjusters about 3 clicks, about 0.009". From the numbers I jotted down when grinding the adjuster screws it looks like specifying valve stem protrusion of 1.06" might be best when valve seats are fitted and standard tappet adjuster screws are re-faced rather than 1.07" for new standard adjuster screws.

Flashlube dispenser was fitted by the offside headlight with its base on the 'floor' panel so that it can be seen through the front grille & filled easily from under the bonnet. With the vacuum tapping in the manifold under the carburettor the dispenser is low enough not to siphon and it's easy to twiddle the adjuster for 12 drops a minute. A lot different from hanging off the edge of the cab floor under the engine cover & close to the exhaust where I found it when I started the job.

One to make the owner cringe: the temperature gauge works fine ... but the disaster happened before the owner was used to CF foibles (i.e. when driving it to West Yorkshire from the Midlands after purchasing it) so couldn't have known that when the heater ran cold was when to stop and check the coolant level, not after the gauge pointer had gone into the red and the engine had staggered to a stop.

EDIT. Since the rebuild the van was sold but only because it was too big for the owner. A good result though: the potential loss in selling it on with a duff engine would have been a bit eye watering. The van then reappeared in Scotland (minus the Autogas system unfortunately) but has a doting new owner now (sort of family too - a member of Auld Vans and Motor Vehicles) who is restoring the rest of the van.
  • What is real is not the external form but the idea, the essence of things. Constantin Brâncuși

Re: A cooked engine

Post by tctor68 » Subscribing Member » Thu Sep 14, 2017 9:37 pm
Joined: Fri Dec 20, 2013 2:37 am
Posts: 306
Here is a credit to your ability Phil, still runing sweet as a nut :thumb:
Only changes are electronic ignition, free flow stainless exhaust and k&n air filter.
Thanks very much
A true Legend in the Cf world 8-)

Tor

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