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Re: Advantura Rebuild

Post by RobX » Subscribing Member » Sun Sep 16, 2018 10:29 pm
Joined: Fri Aug 12, 2016 8:52 pm
Posts: 133
Thanks, chaps! Indeed no room for shower tray - especially as the donor caravan is a big two-berth with an expansive full width bathroom and a full size shower.

A bit more progress this weekend. On Friday I picked up the raw materials I'll need to finish the furniture and the front wall of the Luton. Saturday I built a mobile work table out of the CLS I had lying about from when the camper cover was a tent over a frame. I could have done with a year ago, frankly, but the right kind of thing popped up on Pinterest on Friday, it looked like fun to build and it was. Always nice to turn scrap into something.

Sunday was all about using the new table - for more prep work, replacing a wall I got wrong and fitting out the shelf that will hold the microwave. Prep work was cutting T-slots into the new pieces I had cut on Friday.
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You can't see it in the image, but much time was spent preparing the mounting holes for the microwave, because a microwave with feet that are in a nice, rectangular shape with measurements to, say, multiples of 10mm wouldn't be fun, would it? :)

On the down side, I've realised this fridge will never be able to use gas because the window is too low. Not a big loss to me, since we never intended to use it on gas anyway, but I would have liked the option for it later down the road. Anyway - fitting a smaller fridge later won't be a huge challenge if I decide it's important.

Re: Advantura Rebuild

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Post by Phil Bradshaw » Club admin » Sun Sep 16, 2018 11:16 pm
Joined: Sun Sep 02, 2012 7:15 pm
Posts: 3825
Fridge still will need provision for air circulation: on 12V or mains the heater and chimney can chuck out a fair amount of heat.
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  • What is real is not the external form but the idea, the essence of things. Constantin Brâncuși

Re: Advantura Rebuild

Post by RobX » Subscribing Member » Mon Sep 17, 2018 10:56 am
Joined: Fri Aug 12, 2016 8:52 pm
Posts: 133
I was going to fit floor and top vents anyway. Any thoughts on how important the angle of the exhaust tube is? As you can see in the picture, the tube from the fridge is within the fridge's "box". It's the guide tube that interfaces with the top vent that creates the conflict. I can't even move the window up because there's not enough room between it and the shelf anyway - so I'd need a different window and that wouldn't match the other windows... I guess I'm talking myself into finding a shorter fridge.

Re: Advantura Rebuild

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Post by Phil Bradshaw » Club admin » Mon Sep 17, 2018 1:56 pm
Joined: Sun Sep 02, 2012 7:15 pm
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The angled exhaust adaptor is to prevent noxious gases from hanging around which shouldn't be an issue if only using 12V and 240V.

A deflector may be needed if relying on a plastic grille in the worktop above for ventilation without cutting a hole directly above the chimney (like on a portable 3-way fridge).

If the outlet on the top of the heater assembly below the exhaust adaptor can be detached then a DiY adaptor (22mm copper tube maybe) starting lower down might be an answer for keeping gas as an option.

Or something better may present itself once you start measuring up. :)
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  • What is real is not the external form but the idea, the essence of things. Constantin Brâncuși

Re: Advantura Rebuild

Post by RobX » Subscribing Member » Mon Sep 17, 2018 10:13 pm
Joined: Fri Aug 12, 2016 8:52 pm
Posts: 133
So I took another look and the exhaust was actually on a little extension. Removing that means I can just fit the top vent under the window stringer. The manual says it's recommended that there is 110mm between the bottom of the vent and the top of the condenser for the fridge to work at maximum efficiency in high ambient conditions, and this lowers it to around 88mm. I think can live with that. :)

Re: Advantura Rebuild

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Post by Phil Bradshaw » Club admin » Wed Sep 19, 2018 2:02 pm
Joined: Sun Sep 02, 2012 7:15 pm
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If there's any doubt about exhaust (flue) efficiency then, before installing the fridge, set it up outdoors with your DiY exhaust lashed on somehow so that a smoke test match (from a plumbing supplier or eBay) can be poked into the burner air intake.

If the exhaust won't draw properly then try increasing the exhaust diameter a little to create a small expansion box close to the top of the chimney.
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  • What is real is not the external form but the idea, the essence of things. Constantin Brâncuși

Re: Advantura Rebuild

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Post by Packern Contact Packern » Fri Sep 21, 2018 8:14 pm
Joined: Fri Sep 11, 2015 8:24 pm
Posts: 156
Check first before using copper in exhaust flue's seem to remember it creates noxious stuff but I may be wrong.

If In doubt contact a mobile caravan engineer who's a member of the MCEA they can put you right on gas appliances. Don't take any chances mate.
Nigel Packer

Re: Fitting the Fridge...

Post by RobX » Subscribing Member » Mon Sep 24, 2018 8:58 am
Joined: Fri Aug 12, 2016 8:52 pm
Posts: 133
Thank you both for the advice. I not changing any parts though, just modifying what's already there.

So after much research, it boiled down to four options:
1. Modify the wall to match the fridge (raise window lower edge, hide interior ugliness, find window that matches the others).
2. Fit a chimney (12.5cm diameter; big, ugly and need a hole in the roof).
3. Find a fridge that fits the space (more expense, though I could probably sell this bigger fridge for more than a second-hand smaller one would cost).
4. Shorten the flu and accept the "lower efficiency" described in the installation manual.

I've gone for the last option, and we'll see how it pans out. I'll add a couple of 75mm vents in the floor, I've spaced it out from the wall to double the minimum distance and the fact that the fridge has a step (it's designed to fit over a wheel well) means I'm hoping the flow will be enough. Once the fridge is fitted, I'll fill it up and see if it still goes cold (though we're approaching the time of year where that's not much of a challenge for it..!) Here's some pictures, first outside:
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... then inside:
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Not such a big job in the end: routed a bit out of the vertical and glued some extra horizontals in. Much more and that wall will be a solid wooden panel. :)

Also done a bit more inside, including fitting the knock-in tee edging, which has made a huge difference towards that "almost finished look".

Re: Advantura Rebuild

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Post by Packern Contact Packern » Tue Oct 16, 2018 6:16 pm
Joined: Fri Sep 11, 2015 8:24 pm
Posts: 156
Nice one :)
Nigel Packer

First Skin On

Post by RobX » Subscribing Member » Tue Jan 01, 2019 2:58 pm
Joined: Fri Aug 12, 2016 8:52 pm
Posts: 133
Wow, it's been three months apparently. Most of that spent travelling or suffering a wet, cold or wet and cold weekend..! I had a couple of weather windows where I could have done some work, but the order I placed for ACM skin was delayed... awful customer service but you get what you pay for.

But since we're now having an unseasonably warm year end, and we have an enforced holiday each Xmas, I've had a week and a bit to make some progress. The sheets come in sizes up to 1220mm across, though they can do up to 1500mm as a special order. Good job: what with recreating the original profile with angles, but not bearing that in mind when designing the walls, I needed 1240. First step was to fit the insulation:
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This was surprisingly easy: the trick is to use a sharp new blade in an extensible knife with a 2x1 as a guide; a gentle sawing action using the whole blade gives a nice, clean cut with minimum waste. At the bottom, you can see my makeshift panel support. I didn't photo the glue and clamping on this panel, so let's come back to that for the next. The cat is borrowed from a neighbour. :) Note the angle of the first panel is not perfect because it wasn't easy to get it vertical (and keep it there). First more insulation...
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...then just a touch of glue (I used Wurth Bond & Seal); well, OK: about a tube and a half of it! You can see I've fitted a piece if wood above where the second panel will go, but this turned out to be a bad idea, because of that imperfect angle - I should have done this with the first panel but it was too late at this point. It won't be an issue: whatever I cover the gap with, I'll be able to set to a perfect right angle. Note there's a piece of wood attached to the skirt - the idea is to place the panel on that wood, slide it to the right to align with the first panel's edge, then smooth it all down and clamp it.
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And finally, the panel itself:
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Here you can see how it's clamped: various holes through places where doors, windows or vents will go (braces on the other side, of course), or just into the frame. The glue is good between 5 and 35 degrees centigrade, and it's around 10C during the day here. Overnight, I put a heater inside with the cover over which kept it nice and toasty. I left it 24 hours between fitting and removing the clamps.

Incidentally, the cat in the previous picture and our cat are living together in the camper, and they surely appreciate the heater. :) I'm actually glad they do, because there's a tomcat in the area who likes to spray (the donor caravan already pongs a bit).

Yesterday and today I did the third panel: the big one which covers the transition to the Luton. First, I finished the insulation, then suddenly realised that I didn't know how I was going to this when I did the walls, so there was no vertical strut to attach the front edge of the sheet to. Hence you can see a couple of extra pieces of wood glued in and clamped:
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The grotty bit of wood under the Luton floor will go, but it turns out all the local building suppliers took New Year's Eve off, so I'll have to wait until tomorrow to get the right wood. Same sequence of gluing and clamping as before:
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I actually switched to PU18 adhesive because it seems to do the same job and gets good reviews while being half the price. The rest of the Luton will have to wait for the weekend, as the temperature's dropping for the rest of the week.

I was actually quite worried about how to apply the ACM sheet to a vertical surface, but it turned out to be much easier than I thought. It feels amazing as a surface, compared to the flexing of aluminium sheet and the complexity of folding, stapling, aligning, etc. It's heavier, for sure, but so much more durable. I'm still looking at ideas for covering the joins:
- aluminium tape; quick and easy but may show the profile of the joins.
- aluminum tee bar; cut a 3mm slot with a guided plunge saw and glue it in. High potential for disaster though!
- bath/shower sealing strip; not sure how it would cope with working outdoors.
- there are some heavy duty tapes used in building that might also do.

Happy new year, everyone. The camper turns 40 in November - an important anniversary for various annual costs. :)

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