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Re: CF2 250P panel van.

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Post by Phil Bradshaw » Club admin » Wed May 13, 2015 3:47 pm
Joined: Sun Sep 02, 2012 7:15 pm
Posts: 3373
Happy new MoT test certificate, no advisories. :)

Annual whinge from the tester about the tow ball obscuring the rear number plate ... but he made the point about ANPR being in use more now there's no paper tax disc. :(

So maybe it's time to fit a drop plate because I don't want to move the number plate and lamps - they're fine where they are - and I can always move the tow ball up or down if need be.
  • What is real is not the external form but the idea, the essence of things. Constantin Brâncuși

Re: CF2 250P panel van.

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Post by Phil Bradshaw » Club admin » Mon Aug 24, 2015 10:18 pm
Joined: Sun Sep 02, 2012 7:15 pm
Posts: 3373
Not much to do for a while to keep the van rolling other than poke the fusebox after the ignition supply failed a second time (the first time the supply came back before I could track down the why). Thankful for the 2W warning lamp wired across the coil: no glow for the few seconds after ignition switched on immediately indicated lack of supply, plus the shut-off valve for the carburettor vent not clicking but that wasn't obvious against ambient traffic noise - van decided to fail to proceed at a busy road junction both times. Oh the shame ... :oops:

Tow bar drop plate installed for £10 including new bolts. Not tried a trailer yet to see whether the tow ball has to be put back on the bar but the number plate is no longer obscured unless viewed from ground level. Just hope the Powers That Be don't think of putting ANPR cameras in cat's eyes ...

Main battery died a death finally. Can't moan: must be at least 8 years old. New 075 battery on its way for a whole £34. A slight distraction while checking that the battery wasn't being run flat by the alarm system or summat else, to find 4.6A drain with everything switched off. After unplugging everything the meter still showed 4.6A drain ... which disappeared when a different meter was connected after finding that a 5W test lamp did nothing with everything re-connected. Scratch head.

Then unplug battery charger/engine starter humming away doing nowt next to the battery tray: first meter now at zero. It's a Fluke instrument - deadly accurate compared to most multi-meters - but I'd not bargained for it having a hissy fit with the charger running idle near it. Oh well. Learned something out of it - test lamp first next time - and in the process the wiper arms got a much needed few drops of oil on their pivots and springs to stop them from skriking every sweep.
  • What is real is not the external form but the idea, the essence of things. Constantin Brâncuși

Re: CF2 250P panel van.

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Post by Phil Bradshaw » Club admin » Fri Jun 17, 2016 9:55 pm
Joined: Sun Sep 02, 2012 7:15 pm
Posts: 3373
Time for the annual B service before wheeling the van into the MoT test.

A few items to deal with this year, one being due to neglect of the screen seal leaking, discovered when removing the steering rack to deal with a holed rack gaiter and split rubber coupling -

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The reason for removing the rack and column lower shaft and coupling together is to get at the flange cotter pin after the coupling is removed.

Like so -

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Cotter pin pressed out in a vice using a socket over the pin head. (Awkward holding the rack for this unless a spare pair of hands is available.)

The result of neglect: toe panel gone into holes, here after removing the pedals for better access -

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Bleugh.
  • What is real is not the external form but the idea, the essence of things. Constantin Brâncuși

Toe panel repair, steering column top bearing.

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Post by Phil Bradshaw » Club admin » Fri Jun 17, 2016 10:46 pm
Joined: Sun Sep 02, 2012 7:15 pm
Posts: 3373
Once the rot had been cut out the welding didn't come to much; what took a while was having to remove the seats and bases to get at the work from both sides and then all the cleaning and finishing afterwards so that Rust-Oleum Combicolour had something sound to stick to.

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While the paint (2 coats) was curing hard enough to work on the steering had a make-over involving new rack gaiters, rubber coupling, lower shaft and universal joint and attention to the column upper bearing gone lumpy.

Upper bearing dismantled after extricating the spring ring -

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Reassembly using LM (lithium or wheel bearing) grease -

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Felt ring should be wetted with engine oil before installation.
  • What is real is not the external form but the idea, the essence of things. Constantin Brâncuși

Steering rack and column.

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Post by Phil Bradshaw » Club admin » Fri Jun 17, 2016 11:14 pm
Joined: Sun Sep 02, 2012 7:15 pm
Posts: 3373
Steering rack only needed new gaiters and a refill of oil, 1/3 pint SAE 90 gear oil.

Track rod ends were short of a bit of grease -

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but that was easily sorted once everything was clean.
Oddity here is different ball pin threads and nuts to suit.
Ball pin tapers are identical and tightening torque is the same for both thread sizes.

Once the steering rack is fitted the column shaft assembly can be loosely installed -

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From below, flange cotter pin pressed in with the fingers, nut finger tight, so that the flange can ride up and down the rack pinion shaft -

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Lower bush in place sitting on the thrust washer retained to the shaft by a circlip -

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The fiddly bit: engage bush spigot in cut out in column tube base before sliding tube down to the toe panel -

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Once the column tube is bolted down to the toe panel and the upper clamp is tight the upper bearing and steering wheel can be refitted.

Bearing, thrust ring and spring -

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Once the steering wheel nut is tightened and the steering turned from lock to lock (front wheels raised off ground) to settle the column shaft in the lower bush the flange cotter pin can be tightened.
  • What is real is not the external form but the idea, the essence of things. Constantin Brâncuși

Front shock absorber, loose wheel, bits and pieces

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Post by Phil Bradshaw » Club admin » Fri Jun 17, 2016 11:32 pm
Joined: Sun Sep 02, 2012 7:15 pm
Posts: 3373
The offside front shock absorber has weeped a little oil ever since I acquired the van but this year there was a lot more than a weep dribbling down the body.

Time for a new one, a Boge unit -

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Not these lightweight things off eBay, bought on the basis of replacing the pair rather than just the one.

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Needless to say they were sent back smartish for a full refund.

Earlier upper mounting bush arrangement that came with the Boge unit had to be used because the CF2 plates and bushes are for a smaller diameter of the stem below the threads.

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Fitted -

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Upper mounting nyloc nut replaced by two plain nuts locked together: makes things a bit easier when removing a front shock absorber.
(Oil staining is from application of much penetrating oil during removal.)

Reason for an odd vibration that had appeared last trip out: loose rear wheel, discovered when servicing the rear brakes -

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Other items needed for the MoT test were new turn signal repeater lamps after one lamp fell to bits (Mini rectangular type used), a new tyre to replace what was on the spare wheel that had perished and a prod of the screenwash jets to make them hit the screen more often than not.

Things to do arising from the B service weren't much: a duff spark plug cable, carburettor loose on the manifold (again) and the handbrake cables needing a clean and re-grease while the rear brakes were in bits.

Wheeled the van in for the test: pass, no advisories.

Just the screen rubber to replace at some point. For now the tired old original rubber has been glued to the body with Everbuild hybrid PU sealant/adhesive after raking out old, old sealant. No drips so far ...
  • What is real is not the external form but the idea, the essence of things. Constantin Brâncuși

Year 7

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Post by Phil Bradshaw » Club admin » Sat Jun 03, 2017 8:25 pm
Joined: Sun Sep 02, 2012 7:15 pm
Posts: 3373
Another year on, a largely uneventful B service; not surprising given that the van has covered barely 1000 mile since the last B service and MoT test.

Only extra items were a loose front turn signal lamp to fix plus a new set of ignition HT leads made to fit using Hypalon cable and a new distributor cap because the cap sockets and HT lead terminals had gone green and crumbly.

Also finally rectified the woefully inadequate earth in the trailer socket and trailer board cables using 14/0.30 wire so that nothing dims when everything is on.

Wheeled the van in for MoT test: nearly a fail on emissions until the engine was allowed to idle until hot enough for CO to dip below 2.5%.

The reason became apparent later: temperature gauge reading low. Turns out that the thermostat marked 88C has been opening at 80C; replaced by one that does start to open at 88C.

Now I've discovered that there's a leak when the fuel tank is filled to the top. Hopefully it's just the vent hose connection on the top of the tank but I'm not for handling 50-odd litre of petrol to drop the tank to find out. Later ...
  • What is real is not the external form but the idea, the essence of things. Constantin Brâncuși

Re: CF2 250P panel van.

Post by ToniH » Sat Nov 18, 2017 8:55 am
Joined: Wed May 10, 2017 2:18 am
Posts: 3
Intresting project! I´m thinking to swap broken opel 2,1diesel to cih petrol engine, but seems like that petrol engine is more left than diesel. Can you measure engine mounts both side please?
Commodore A 2dht v8 -67
Rekord C 2dht -68
Astra f 1,6 -97
Astra f 1,8 16v -94
Vectra a 2,0i cdx -95
Bedford cf350 van -80

Re: CF2 250P panel van.

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Post by Phil Bradshaw » Club admin » Sun Nov 19, 2017 11:00 am
Joined: Sun Sep 02, 2012 7:15 pm
Posts: 3373
Opel CIH engine is mounted at an angle to the chassis, about 5 degree left of centre, for clearance on the manifolds side.

I'll dig out a tape measure some time ...
  • What is real is not the external form but the idea, the essence of things. Constantin Brâncuși

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