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Springy Sides

Post by Shambolic » Sun Mar 05, 2017 1:52 pm
Joined: Thu Jul 16, 2015 4:42 am
Posts: 75
I assume springy sides mean spongy frame.. So I'll have to try to vastly improve my woeful woodwork skills I guess.

I can't really remove the exterior panels, so does anyone have any tips on repairing the presumed rotted woodwork from the inside? Ideally in sections, so the structural integrity (what's left) isn't too compromised if left overnight.

Re: Springy Sides

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Post by Phil Bradshaw » Club admin » Sun Mar 05, 2017 6:45 pm
Joined: Sun Sep 02, 2012 7:15 pm
Posts: 3733
If rot is localised then it can be possible to repair the damage from inside if you have somewhere to store what has to come out so that you have a clear run at the damage. Springy body sides aren't promising though: can mean stringers are shot as well as frame verticals.

May be worth partly peeling away panels at roof level to check the cant (corner) rails where the transverse roof sticks are attached; if the rails are soggy then it's a safe bet everything below will be similarly affected. Here it may be easier to work from outside so that panels and trim can be bodged back into place temporarily if what you find is too much to take on now.
  • What is real is not the external form but the idea, the essence of things. Constantin Brâncuși

Re: Springy Sides

Post by Shambolic » Mon Mar 06, 2017 4:09 am
Joined: Thu Jul 16, 2015 4:42 am
Posts: 75
I've got storage, but haven't got anywhere indoors to do the actual work - So the thought of removing major exterior panelling and having to leave it overnight or longer is a touch scary.

I'll have to think on how to tackle this, as if it can't really be done from the inside there's quite a logistics challenge.

And thinking of challenges, I've seen people say 25mmx25mm or 25mmx50mm wood is the usual. I had a thought - 12mm exterior ply cut into 50mm strips, and overlapped/ doubled up and glued. I imagine it would weight slightly more than softwood strips, but should give more strength and damp resistance as well as being easier for overlapping/ lap joints. But I'm not really good with woodwork, so perhaps I'm missing an obvious reason why this would be a bad idea?

Re: Springy Sides

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Post by Phil Bradshaw » Club admin » Mon Mar 06, 2017 5:32 am
Joined: Sun Sep 02, 2012 7:15 pm
Posts: 3733
Glulam (ply bonded together for structural use) employed for holding up buildings has much greater strength and stability than natural timber. A structure that I'm familiar with which is all timber construction, the main trusses forming a self supporting frame within which much of the ground floor is one large open space -

Image

Using glulam to replace soggy softwood in a coachbuilt body certainly would be an adventure. For some idea of the technology and its uses have a look at the GLTA website.

Exterior ply commonly available often translates as cheap crap made from whatever floats down the river during deforestation and is prone to de-laminating due to different properties of randomly selected materials, like 'hardwood' exterior doors made from Indonesian timber which need protecting from UK climate just to keep their shape once the plastic packaging is removed. Birch ply is a much more stable and stronger material and is a lot better to work with but is costly in comparison.

PTW (pressure treated wood) may be a simpler option, i.e. like for like replacement using conventional tools and techniques, and could build a very long rot-free life into the body. Environmental issues inherent in CCA (chromated copper arsenate) commonly used for PTW are rather long term though (speciation in freshwater crustacea for example) and extent of health hazards when working the stuff is not yet fully known.

Just using reds (generally European pine) instead of whites (spruce) can be a step change especially if the original frame was constructed from Polish whites of the day shipped as unprotected deck cargo and prone to mould as a consequence.

Opening up a soggy body has advantage in allowing things to dry out even if sheeted over against the weather between sessions ... but first pick a period when it's not so likely to be too wet or windy to work outdoors.

A good long think before doing anything always pays nonetheless. :thumb:
  • What is real is not the external form but the idea, the essence of things. Constantin Brâncuși

Re: Springy Sides

Post by Shambolic » Mon Apr 10, 2017 3:21 am
Joined: Thu Jul 16, 2015 4:42 am
Posts: 75
Well, I accidentally caught an overhang the other night, putting a small hole in the side, breaking a window, and tugging the corner a little apart. Not one of my better days.

However, it got worse when I realised the only thing holding the sides and back together is the 50mm plastic angle someone has randomly screwed on where I assume there was once aluminium moulding.

The frame is mostly wet soil, the plastic angle has bare screws through it that probably only aided in giving the water somewhere to get in through.

To say I'm feeling low right now is an understatement.

However, the thing has (somehow!) a near full MOT, and I can't afford to write it off after what it's already cost.

Fixing (well, putting in!) the frame isn't going to be too huge a challenge, perhaps. But I don't know what to do about this rubbish plastic angle stuff. How possible is it to DIY form the original type aluminium?

lastly, after crumbling the inner panels off, I can see the back and sides have quite large gaps - And not from where I snagged on something and pulled the body open. It looks like the plastic angle was put on with these gaps present, but the rear panel (at least) has maybe 6mm differences between ends of each plastic segment. will I even get away with the original aluminium when I've got such huge tolerances? or should I live with the plastic/ replace like for like, and just make sure the whole lot is actually sealed and properly affixed?

Re: Springy Sides

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Post by VDUB384 » Club admin » Mon Apr 10, 2017 9:16 am
Joined: Wed Sep 12, 2012 9:01 am
Posts: 1367
Hi this is what you need to replace the plastic angle they use it to join the sheets at all corners including the roof to sides.
http://www.olearymotorhomes.co.uk/corne ... -112-p.asp
Dave
Whilst good maintainece is the best prevention"If its not broken don't fix it."
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Re: Springy Sides

Post by Shambolic » Tue Apr 11, 2017 4:32 pm
Joined: Thu Jul 16, 2015 4:42 am
Posts: 75
VDUB384 wrote:Hi this is what you need to replace the plastic angle they use it to join the sheets at all corners including the roof to sides.
http://www.olearymotorhomes.co.uk/corne ... -112-p.asp
Dave
Excellent, thanks!

Given its shape, how easy is it to form around the rear upper corner where the roof curves?

Or does the Glendale have a fairly standard radius that I might be able to cut from a scrapper caravan/ camper?

Re: Springy Sides

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Post by VDUB384 » Club admin » Thu Apr 13, 2017 11:17 am
Joined: Wed Sep 12, 2012 9:01 am
Posts: 1367
With this profile your better using new as used is usually bent to suit what it comes off although it would be cheaper it would be a lot more work.
Dave
Whilst good maintainece is the best prevention"If its not broken don't fix it."
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Re: Springy Sides

Post by Shambolic » Thu Apr 13, 2017 7:09 pm
Joined: Thu Jul 16, 2015 4:42 am
Posts: 75
Price wasn't the concern - It was shaping it to the radius of the rear end of the roof.

If the Glendale used a fairly standard radius, then soucing either a pre-bent or used section would've been ideal, as I'm a touch nervous about bending the extrusion myself.

Also need to see if I can find somewhere local to buy it, so I don't have to deal with shorter lengths (and probably high courier costs).

I'm, shall we say apprehesive, about tackling this job - But without it the Bedford isn't even a shedford, it's just a loosley rested together assortment of bin fodder. So.. deep breath time.

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