Robin from France
 
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Joined: Thu Jan 02, 2014 2:17 pm
Hi everyone,

I've just purchased my third cf (it's catching!)

After a '78 Trailblazer which has been lightly updated and customized, and a '76 diesel panel van which is still somewhere at the back of my workshop, I picked up this beast last weekend:

Image

I know about the reverse thread on the driver's side (continental) but I'm missing the lug wrench. At a guess it is probably 1 1/8th inches, but I'd like confirmation before I start looking for one (or a 3/4 inch socket will do)

Also what size tyres to fit? I think it's 185R14 but can someone confirm please?

Thanks,
Robin

Postby Robin from France » Tue May 03, 2016 5:12 pm


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Phil Bradshaw
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Location: Rossendale (BB4)
Wheel nut size is 28mm AF (5/8-inch Whitworth in old money, 1.1 inch across flats).
1+1/8 inch AF (1.125 inch) hexagon socket will do (and may be easier to use on rusty nuts). :)

The ideal tool is a Melco HDW/1/E plus two HDW/E/TB 30 inch extensions for 'cracking' even the most stubborn of wheel nuts.

Tightening torque (threads clean and dry, cones lightly smeared with grease) is 290 Nm (215 lbf ft).

Tyres: 185R14, pressure 2.8 bar (40 psi) all round when fully laden.
    What is real is not the external form but the idea, the essence of things. Constantin Brâncuși

Postby Phil Bradshaw » Tue May 03, 2016 5:42 pm


Robin from France
 
Posts: 66
Joined: Thu Jan 02, 2014 2:17 pm
Thanks Phil - that's another cup of tea I owe you...

I'd better get looking for a 28mm socket then.

Robin

Postby Robin from France » Tue May 03, 2016 6:06 pm


Robin from France
 
Posts: 66
Joined: Thu Jan 02, 2014 2:17 pm
And I forgot to ask the other part, as usual...

Tube less or not tubeless, that is the question.

As fitted I've got tubeless tyres with tubes in them (!) and the wheels are in good condition, but the tyres are shot.

Robin

Postby Robin from France » Tue May 03, 2016 6:18 pm


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Phil Bradshaw
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Location: Rossendale (BB4)
5.00Kx14 rims have no rebates for tubeless tyre beads: once a tyre deflates it can come off the rim.

On the other hand, a punctured tube usually will deflate much more rapidly than a punctured tubeless tyre.

Fitting tubeless tyres can be a pain as well if either bead won't seat properly during inflation.
Quick and dirty remedy is to spray WD40 or similar into the tyre then ignite it so that both beads seat well enough to allow normal inflation.
    What is real is not the external form but the idea, the essence of things. Constantin Brâncuși

Postby Phil Bradshaw » Tue May 03, 2016 10:20 pm


Robin from France
 
Posts: 66
Joined: Thu Jan 02, 2014 2:17 pm
Thanks for that Phil.

I'm going to get 4 new 185R14 tyres then (and keep the only two good ones I've got for the inside rears. I've got six rims with riveted centres and one welded rim with Michelin written on it. Out of seven, three have tubes, so I'll do without and leave the fitting to a professional (with or without WD40)

I also managed to borrow a 28mm socket wrench which worked wonders.

Robin

Postby Robin from France » Wed May 04, 2016 7:39 pm


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Phil Bradshaw
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Check the welded rim to be sure that it is identical (centre offset, stud holes shape etc.) in case it's an early model Transit rim, or even LDV.
    What is real is not the external form but the idea, the essence of things. Constantin Brâncuși

Postby Phil Bradshaw » Wed May 04, 2016 8:03 pm


Robin from France
 
Posts: 66
Joined: Thu Jan 02, 2014 2:17 pm
Hi,

the wheel is identical save the absence of rivets and the Michelin sign instead of the Dunlop sign. I'm also looking at coulours - the wheels still have original paint on the insides, four are cream, two are dark grey and the Michelin rim is a lighter grey. The cream suits best, but should I use Hammerite or similar, or is it a chassis paint?

Any ideas?

Robin

Postby Robin from France » Thu May 05, 2016 9:51 am


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Phil Bradshaw
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Location: Rossendale (BB4)
Hammerite cures to a glass-like brittleness over time so will chip easily.

I've found Combicolour (aka Rustoleum) to be a good compromise for durability and sticking to just about any clean surface without going over the top with preparation. Does what it says on the tin. :)

I've also found Combicolout thoroughly mixed with a small amount of xylene base thinners to be good at binding together existing iffy paint cover once the loose stuff has been scrubbed off.
    What is real is not the external form but the idea, the essence of things. Constantin Brâncuși

Postby Phil Bradshaw » Thu May 05, 2016 10:48 am