Where to find help when you want to change major units on your CF - engine, transmission, brakes etc. - or upgrade earlier models to later specifications.
Greendak
 
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Hi, I have a 1972 Bedford CF Landcruiser with an original engine and was wondering which diesel engine is the best to swap in? I have heard about Ford Transit engines being an 'easy' fit... Thanks!

Postby Greendak » Tue Jan 12, 2016 10:37 am


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Phil Bradshaw
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None of them are 'easy' fit because the engine mounting support posts for the original Vauxhall OHC ('slant') engine are offset away from the centre line of the chassis.

This can be overcome by fitting an axle beam from a diesel engine model (or CF2, petrol or diesel) or welding new support posts onto the existing axle beam after cutting off the original support posts.

The next problem is how much of the bodywork has to be altered in order to fit an engine needing more elbow room than the original engine and, or, how much needs modifying on the engine (e.g. oil pan shape) for it to clear the front axle beam. Position of the engine centre of mass is important here: neither too far forwards nor too high up if the suspension and stability of the van are not to be compromised. What can and cannot be carved out of the body will depend on how this may weaken the monocoque construction.

Then there is much head scratching and pencil chewing over type of transmission to go for if the original Vauxhall gearbox is past its best or cannot be adapted to fit the incoming engine and how to marry it to the CF propellor shaft and also have the speedometer record actual road speed (give or take lawful range of error).

And so on: the devil is in the details. However, this doesn't mean that a chosen engine won't fit; anything is possible with enough determination, a lot of free time and enough spare cash to buy and fettle all the bits needed ...

Meanwhile, for a camper van that doesn't do a lot of miles in any one year the original Vauxhall OHC engine may the better option even if it needs significant repair or replacement.
    What is real is not the external form but the idea, the essence of things. Constantin Brâncuși

Postby Phil Bradshaw » Tue Jan 12, 2016 11:37 am


philbut
 
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The Transit Di is a very noisy lump, especially the pre-banana (which fits more easily due to the smaller inlet manifold). I did the conversion in my Bedouin and it was not easy - require lower cross member to be chopped and re-inforced below. Made the van noisy as hell to drive to the point where I got rid of it. I now run a granada 2.9v6 fuel injected petrol engine. Much better conversion all round and requires no modification to the fire wall so you can use the stock (diesel) engine cover.

As Phil said anything will fit if you are handy with a grinder and a welder. The fact you share the cab with the engine in a CF does mean you really need to take into consideration how noisy the donor lump will be - unless you like wearing ear plugs when you drive ;-)

Postby philbut » Wed Jan 13, 2016 10:30 am


Greendak
 
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Thanks for the input! Yeah it's already noisy, wondered if the rumours that it was a generally easy swap were true. Guess not!

Postby Greendak » Thu Jan 14, 2016 8:46 am


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Phil Bradshaw
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A lot can be done to make things less noisy by insulating the engine cover and cab floor with sound absorbing material (but if there are rainwater leaks into the cab then fix those before laying anything on the floor).

Later pre-insulated engine cover will fit the aperture but most that have come up for sale lately have been the type with three toggle fasteners requiring latch plates attached to the sides and rear of the aperture.
    What is real is not the external form but the idea, the essence of things. Constantin Brâncuși

Postby Phil Bradshaw » Fri Jan 15, 2016 6:08 pm


smithjake16
 
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Hi guys, I've just bought a landcruiser 1975 2.3 petrol and i'm looking to do a similar conversion hoping to improve mpg. How did you get on with yours? What engine did you go for in the end?

Postby smithjake16 » Tue Feb 07, 2017 12:04 am


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VDUB384
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Like Phil said it depends on your annual mileage if it's worth putting a transit diesel in a CF, because from what I've heard they're very noisy, with a land cruiser the mpg shouldn't be that bad. I run a CF350 coach built twin wheeler that does about 17 mpg on a run on Petrol however as soon as I purchased it over 8 years ago I had an LPG conversion on it I get 13/13.5 mpg on a run towing a classic caravan which equals to 26/27 mpg with the price of lpg being less than half of petrol and I know for a fact if I had gone the diesel way I would be lucky to get 25 mpg on a run with the weight of my camper and the noise would be horrific.
Dave
Whilst good maintainece is the best prevention"If its not broken don't fix it."
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Postby VDUB384 » Tue Feb 07, 2017 9:21 am


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Phil Bradshaw
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The way the bunglement is talking about diesel exhaust pollution being double plus ungood (cue tax rises on fuel, widespread city bans etc.) it might be best to stick with the original petrol engine.
    What is real is not the external form but the idea, the essence of things. Constantin Brâncuși

Postby Phil Bradshaw » Tue Feb 07, 2017 11:35 am